Friday, 20 September 2019

The Archies - What Goes On (1970)

Like the Dave Clark Five before them in a previous post, The Archies have an undeserved reputation that they will have a hard job to live down, mainly due to just one song - the irresistibly catchy 'Sugar, Sugar'. This track is the epitome of bubblegum pop, and for people who like a bit more sophistication in their music this was enough to put them off the band for good. They didn't help themselves by having a repertoire which included songs like 'Bang-Shang-A-Lang', Jingle Jangle', and 'La De Doo Down Down', but it would be pretty nigh on impossible to fill five albums with songs all of the same calibre, and so tucked away on the records is some pretty good sunshine pop and even the odd hard rocker. Although the band was a fictional group based on characters from Archie comics, the actual music was performed by some well-respected session musicians, including Ron Dante on lead vocals, and Toni Wine on lead and backing vocals, with additional vocals being provided during the sessions by Jeff Barry, Andy Kim, Ellie Greenwich, Susan Morse and Ritchie Adams. The music was provided by Hugh McCracken and Dave Appell on guitar, Chuck Rainey and Joey Macho on bass, Ron Frangipane on keyboards, and Buddy Saltzman and Gary Chester on drums. The songs were mostly written by Jeff Barry, often in collaboration with Andy Kim, and sometime with Ron Dante. On later albums they handed over the reins to Ritchie Adams and Robert Levine, with Ron Dante writing a couple with Bob Gengo and Gene Allan. With such a plethora of talent in the writing and the musicianship there's bound to be some worthwhile songs scattered throughout the albums, and so I've gathered what I think are the best of them onto one disc, omitting all the bubblegum stuff and concentrating on tracks which would have been hailed as great pop songs if only they weren't by The Archies. I've kept the cartoon theme for the cover but gone for a more mature version of the characters by Jaime Hernandez, to reflect the music on here.



Track listing

01 Hide And Seek
02 A Time For Love
03 Truck Driver
04 Catchin' Up On Fun
05 I'm In Love
06 Circle Of Blue
07 Love Light
08 Everything's Alright
09 Get On The Line
10 You Know I Love You
11 Mr. Factory
12 Waldo P. Emerson Jones
13 Comes The Sun
14 Suddenly Susan
15 Hold On To Lovin'
16 Should Anybody Ask
17 What Goes On
      
Enjoy / Enjoy

Red Shark - Le Fin (1986)

I bought this cassette in 1986, and have played it many, many times since as it stood out so much from a lot of the other tapes that I got at the time. This is their story, from the inlay of the cassette. 
Red Shark - A Fishy Story
It was the hot sleazy summer of '83 - long times of depravity and excess - that saw the spawning of Red Shark - Steve, Robin, Derek and Jackie. The remains of Incubus; defunct after the departure of Sean, joined up with Keith (new guitar in hand) and the vulturous Medlock to comprise the Mk1 line-up. After  few gigs in and out of town, October '84 saw a new slimline Red Shark with Jackie and Medlock (keyboards and vocals) swimming off to fresher waters. From then on a general tightening up took place along with a broadening of the Red Shark sound. Although the OTT electric thrashout still lives on (re. 'Thorn In My Side') the band adapted a southern bluesy feel to some of their songs. The next major change was as recent as Nov. '85, which heralded the arrival of sax player Brian. This is the second cassette release by Red Shark, the first 'The Return Of Red Shark', now being something of a collectors item, also marked the first venture of Ian and Claire's Bite Back! enterprise, which is now a growing concern in Portsmouth. The tracks on this tape  - except for side two, tracks 1 & 3 - were recorded in summer '85. The original intention was to select two of these for release on the Bite Back! EP 'Sour Mash' (BB!006). Encouraged by growing support, the band re-entered Martyn's studio - now armed with digital mastering equipment. Four more tracks were rattled off - two for this tape, two for the EP. Red Shark are renowned for their lack of resources (money, amps, common sense etc.) and would like to thank everybody who has helped/is helping towards their continuing existence. 
The music is a great mix of psyche and indie, with their take on the Velvet's 'I Can't Stand It' being a highlight. They also cover Billie Holiday's 'Fine And Mellow', but the rest of the songs are all original material, and as this tape has been a favourite of mine for the past 30 odd years, I thought I'd post it to share this great music from a band who really should have been picked up by an indie label at the time. They still have a live myspace page but it doesn't look like it's been updated for a while, and I'd be very surprised if they still existed in any form, but you never know.  



Track listing

01 Buddhist Chant
02 I Saw The Devil
03 They'll Never Know
04 The Money Goes Further
05 I Can't Stand It
06 Thorn In My Side
07 Fine And Mellow

Enjoy / Enjoy

Todd Rundgren And The Hello People - Mad Red Ant Lady (1972)

I'll start by saying that I consider Todd Rundgren as something of a musical genius - singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer and engineer, band leader and solo artist, and fashion icon! (just check out some of his stage outfits from the 70's and 80's). He started his musical career in the band Woody's Truck Stop, before leaving them to form his own band The Nazz, who released three albums of Anglophile rock, heavily influenced by The Beatles and The Who, but with Rundgren writing the material. On their first album he even took a stab a producing the record after the actual producer Bill Traut had gone home, adding effects such as varispeed and flanging to the recordings. The single 'Open My Eyes' backed with 'Hello It's Me' became their first hit, and the albums 'Nazz' and 'Nazz Nazz' followed, with 'Nazz III' being released some time later after the band had left the label, and the old record company collected together some outtakes and off-cuts to cobble together something to release to make a quick buck. Some of these came from the sessions for their second record, which was originally to have been a double album entitled 'Fungo Bat', but the record company cut it down to a single record and re-titled it 'Nazz Nazz'. 
After The Nazz split his songwriting became very much influenced by artists such as Laura Nyro, who he felt had a unique songwriting style, and he continued to write and record songs while working as a producer for other bands in New York. Among his production duties during this period were albums by The American Dream, Great Speckled Bird, and on a recommendation by The Band's Robbie Robertson he produced a record for Jessie Winchester, which impressed Robertson so much that he was asked to produce The Band's 'Stage Fright' album. Despite his successful productions, he still wanted to make his own music, and so formed the band Runt in 1970, including Hunt and Tony Sales, years before they joined David Bowie in Tin Machine. Rundgren himself wrote, produced, sang, and played guitars, keyboard, and other instruments on the record, and so whether Runt is best described as a band or simply a pseudonym for Rundgren the solo artist is open to conjecture. For the album 'Runt' the group appeared to be a bona fide trio, but on their second album 'Runt: The Ballad of Todd Rundgren', Hunt Sales plays only on two tracks and is replaced by N. D. Smart on the rest of the album. 
By this time, Rundgren had effectively moved his base to Los Angeles, and as he prepared for his second solo album, he met aspiring LA band Half-Nelson, led by brothers Ron and Russell Mael, with guitarist Earle Mankey. After attending an elaborate, self-staged 'showcase' performance by the group at their LA rehearsal space, Rundgren agreed to produce their debut album, originally released as 'Half-Nelson' and later re-titled 'Sparks', and the brothers have credited Rundgren with launching their career. By 1972, the Runt persona/band identity had been abandoned, and Rundgren's ambitious double album 'Something/Anything?' was credited simply to Rundgren, who wrote, played, sang, engineered, and produced everything on three of the four sides of the album. It provided Rundgren with two hit singles in 'I Saw the Light' and a remake of the Nazz near-hit 'Hello It's Me', and on the subsequent tour he asked The Hello People to be his backing band. Rundgren and The Hello People went into Ultrasonic Studios in 1972 to record a number of the songs from the album, and when I found this bootleg I was really looking forward to hearing studio recordings of full band versions of the songs, but on playing it I found that it was actually a live concert in front of an invited audience. The recording itself was studio quality, though, and so to make up for my disappointment I decided to remove all the audience noise to make the studio album that I expected to hear. A few edits and fades later and I have the band album that I wanted, so here is a great vintage recording of Rundgren at his peak, with a band behind him who know exactly what he wants, and featuring a number of songs that I assume are Hello People originals, including the title track which they eventually released a couple of years later.   



Track listing

01 Broke Down & Busted
02 Georgia Swing
03 Piss Aaron
04 Outside Love
05 A Dream Goes On Forever
06 I Saw The Light
07 Blaze
08 It Wouldn't Have Made Any Difference
09 Feels So Good To Be Alive
10 Mad Red Ant Lady
11 Lady On The Terrace
12 Slut

Enjoy / Enjoy

Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Vangelis - Themes (2018)

Evángelos Odysséas Papathanassíou was born on 29 March 1943 in Agria, Greece, and raised in Athens. At the age of twelve he developed an interest in jazz and rock music, and at fifteen he started to form school bands, acquiring his first Hammond organ at eighteen. In 1963, the newly named Vangelis and three school friends started a short-lived five-piece rock band called The Forminx, and after they split he spent the next two years mostly in the studio, writing and producing for other Greek artists. He also composed scores for Greek films, completing six over those two years, and in 1968 he moved to London in order to further his career. However, he was denied entry into the UK and so settled in Paris for the next six years, where he formed the progressive rock band Aphrodite's Child with Demis Roussos, Loukas Sideras, and Anargyros "Silver" Koulouris. Their debut single 'Rain and Tears' was a commercial success in Europe, and was followed by two albums, 'End of the World' in 1968 and 'It's Five O'Clock' in 1969. Vangelis conceived the idea of their third record as a concept album based on the Book of Revelation, and '666' is now hailed as a progressive rock masterpiece. If you haven't heard either the pop songs or '666' then do check them out as they are all classics of their genre. 
After increasing tensions during the recording of '666', the group split in 1971, with Roussos going on to have a number of hit singles in a long career as a pop singer, while Vangelis set up his own 16-track studio, Nemo Studios, and secured a record deal with RCA Records. He released some well-received electronic albums throughout the 70's, simultaneously scoring a number of films, including 'Ignacio' aka 'Do You Hear the Dogs Barking?' in 1975, and scores for some of Frederic Rossif's nature documentaries in 1976 and 1979. In 1980, Vangelis agreed to record the score for 'Chariots of Fire', winning an Academy Award for Best Original Music Score, and with his star now in the ascendant he was much sought-after to compose film soundtracks. In 1982 he scored 'Missing' for director by Costa-Gavras, which was awarded the Palme d'Or and gained Vangelis a nomination for a BAFTA Award for Best Film Music. In 1981, he collaborated with director Ridley Scott to score his science fiction film 'Blade Runner', expertly capturing the isolation and melancholy of Harrison Ford's character, Rick Deckard. In 1992, Paramount Pictures released the film '1492: Conquest of Paradise', also directed by Ridley Scott, and the score by Vangelis was nominated for Best Original Score – Motion Picture' at the 1993 Golden Globe awards, which then to offers of work on the 1992 films 'Bitter Moon' and 'The Plague'. 
In 2002 he wrote the theme for the FIFA World Cup, and in 2018 he composed a tribute to Stephen Hawking, which was given out free to guests attending the Service of Thanksgiving at Westminster Abbey when Stephen Hawking's ashes were interred. After the interment some remaining copies were available from the Stephen Hawking Foundation in return for a charitable donation until stock ran out. For this collection of his film soundtracks I've deliberately omitted his four most famous works, on 'Chariots Of Fire', 'Missing', 'Blade Runner' and 'The Bounty', as they are already quite well-known, and can be found on an official collection of his soundtrack work. Instead I've concentrated on the rarer, early work for lesser-known directors, although I have included the theme to '1492' as it was too late to be included on the official collection and it's also one of my favourites. It's a fairly long album at 70 minutes, but it flows so well that I don't want to split it into two, so we'll just treat it as a CD.  



Track listing

01 Sex Power Part IX from 'Sex Power' 1970
02 Theme from 'Salut, Jerusalem' 1972
03 Generique from 'L'Apocalypse des Animaux' 1973
04 Theme from 'Amore' 1973
05 Theme from 'Ignacio (Do You Hear The Dogs Barking?)' 1975
06 Theme from 'La Fete Sauvage' 1976
07 Hymne from 'Opera Sauvage' 1979
08 Theme from the TV Series 'Cosmos' 1980
09 Theme from 'Antarctica' 1983
10 Theme from 'Sauvage et Beau' 1984
11 Theme from 'De Nuremburg A Nuremburg' 1989
12 Theme from '1492 :(Conquest Of Paradise)' 1992
13 Theme from 'Bitter Moon' 1992
14 Theme from 'The Plague' 1992
15 Theme from 'Cavafy' 1996
16 Anthem for the FIFA World Cup 2002
17 Theme from 'El Greco' 2007
18 Seize The Moment - The Stephen Hawking Tribute 2018

Enjoy / Enjoy

Friday, 13 September 2019

Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark - 66 And Fading (1983)

Thanks to Anon for reminding me what a great little band Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark were in their early days. Formed in 1978 by Andrew McCluskey and Paul Humphries, who had first worked together in Merseyside band The Id 1977, the paid were keen to experiment with with tape collages, home-made kit-built synthesisers, and circuit-bent radios. After The Id split, McCluskey joined Wirral outfit Dalek, I Love You as lead singer, but only lasted a month, and so rejoined Humphries to form Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark - the name taken from a list of potential song lyrics on McCluskey's bedroom wall, and deliberately chosen so as not to sound like a punk band name. They released their first single 'Electricity' in 1979, and it was a breath of fresh air, coming as it did at the tail end of the punk boom, and I grabbed my copy straight away, ending up with one of the Factory copies with the textured sleeve - still a prized possession. Its success led to the band being signed by the DinDisc label, who re-issued the single, and followed it with a worthy successor in 'Red Frame, White Light', and when the debut album appeared the following year it easily lived up to the promise of those singles. 'Organisation' was another fine album, and 'Enola Gay' was their first mainstream hit single, at which point I usually tended to abandon a group that I felt had sold out the The Man, but with OMD I stuck with them for one more album, as 'Architecture & Morality' seemed a bit more experimental that its predecessor, but that was the end of my love affair with the band. Looking back at those early days, there were a few songs tucked away on b-sides which I hadn't heard before so I gave them a listen and found that I'd been missing out on some good stuff. The band also included a free 7" EP of demo recordings with the vinyl edition of their second album, so I've added that to the b-sides up to 1983, including the dub version of 'Messages', renamed 'Taking Sides Again', for this reminder of both the melodic pop songs and also the more experimental music that the band were producing at the start of their career.    



Track listing

01 Introducing Radios (from the free 7" EP with 'Organisation' 1980)
02 Distance Fades Between Us (from the free 7" EP with 'Organisation' 1980)
03 Progress (from the free 7" EP with 'Organisation' 1980)
04 I Betray My Friends (b-side of 'Red Frame White Light' 1980)
05 Waiting For The Man (b-side of 'Messages' 1980)
06 Taking Sides Again (b-side of 'Messages' 1980)
07 Annex (b-side of 'Enola Gay' 1980)
08 Navigation (b-side of 'Maid Of Orleans' 1981)
09 Sacred Heart (b-side of 'Souvenir' 1981)
10 66 & Fading (b-side of 'Telegraph' 1983)
11 4-Neu (b-side of 'Genetic Engineering' 1983)
12 Once When I Was Six (from the free 7" EP with 'Organisation' 1980)

Enjoy / Enjoy

The Dream Syndicate - Weathered And Torn (1987)

The Dream Syndicate were one of the first, and undoubtedly one of the best, of the short-lived Paisley Underground movement of the early 80's. Along with Rain Parade, Green On Red, The Bangles and The Three O'Clock they blended their love of 60's psychedelic music with a healthy dose of Americana to come up with a new genre - neo-psyche. The Dream Syndicate were formed when Steve Wynn met Karl Precoda in Los Angeles and the two formed a new group, with Wynn's friend from the University of California Kendra Smith on bass, and a drummer that she brought with her, Dennis Duck. Duck suggested the name 'the Dream Syndicate' in reference to Tony Conrad's early 1960's New York experimental ensemble (better known as the Theatre of Eternal Music), whose members included John Cale, and on February 23, 1982, the newly-named Dream Syndicate performed their first show at Club Lingerie in Hollywood. A four-song EP was recorded at the home of Tom Mehren in Pasadena and released on Wynn's Down There label, and the band quickly achieved local attention for their often aggressively long, feedback-soaked improvisations. The band signed to Slash Records, whose subsidiary Ruby Records released their debut album, 'The Days of Wine and Roses', in 1982. This album sent shockwaves through the American underground in the early 1980's, and remains one of my all-time favourite records. 
Following it's release, Smith left the band and joined David Roback (formerly of Rain Parade) to form Opal, and she was replaced on bass by David Provost. 'Medicine Show' was recorded in 1984 in San Francisco with producer Sandy Pearlman and released that year by A&M Records, and was a worthy follow-up to 'Days....', and between opening for bands such as R.E.M. and U2, they released the five-song live EP, 'This Is Not The New Dream Syndicate Album... Live!'. This was the last record to feature Precoda on guitar, as he left soon afterward to pursue a career in screenwriting, and he was replaced by Mark Walton. The EP's commercial failure contributed to the group's temporary breakup, and the band was dropped by A&M after the label rejected its demo for 'Slide Away', later released on the semi-official 'It's Too Late To Stop Now' compilation. After a brief hiatus Wynn, Duck and Walton joined forces with Paul B. Cutler (who had produced the group's first EP) to form the next version of the Dream Syndicate, and in 1986 they released the more mainstream rock of 'Out of the Grey'. The following year they wrote and recorded a number of songs for a proposed new album, but it was never released, and so this is The Dream Syndicate's lost album, recorded in Los Angeles between their third and fourth official releases, and featuring Chris Cacavas of Green on Red. It's the missing link between their later Americana sound and the Velvets spirit of 'The Days of Wine and Roses', and only the title track has since turned up on an official album, appearing on 'Ghost Stories' in 1988. If you're a fan of the band then this is a must-hear record, and they're still releasing superb albums today, with the latest 'These Times' sounding just as fresh as when they started.   



Track listing

01 Here On Earth As Well (recorded in Hollywood, April 1985)
02 Blood Money (recorded in Hollywood, April 1985)
03 It Hits You Again (recorded in Hollywood, August 1985)
04 I Ain't Living Long Like This (recorded at Lyceum Studios, August 1987)
05 Killing Time (recorded at Lyceum Studios, August 1987)
06 Lucky (recorded at Lyceum Studios, August 1987)
07 Weathered And Torn (recorded at Lyceum Studios, August 1987)
08 The Best Years Of My Life (recorded at Lyceum Studios, August 1987)
09 Running From The Memory (recorded at Lyceum Studios, August 1987)

Enjoy / Enjoy

The Rolling Stones - Fancyman Blues (1989)

I may have mentioned previously that I'm not the biggest fan of the Rolling Stones, although I do love all their stuff from the 60's, and a few albums from the early 70's, so I've never heard either 'Steel Wheels' or 'Voodoo Lounge' from the 80's. I recently discovered a bootleg of outtakes from those two albums, and the comments seemed to indicate that some of the songs left off the albums were better that those which made it, and on listening to 'Fancyman Blues' and 'For Your Precious Love' I could see their point, as they were both superb recordings which somehow were not considered good enough for the final track listing. Using that as a starting point I investigated further and found that some of the tracks on the bootleg had eventually turned up on b-sides, including the afore-mentioned 'Fancyman Blues' in a shortened version, and so I listened to those b-sides and found that a lot of them were surprisingly good songs. I've therefore taken all the b-sides from the singles extrated from those two albums, added in the best outtakes, including a great track with Keith on vocals, a sublime reading of 'For Your Precious Love', and the extended version of 'Fancyman Blues', and come up with an album that I actually enjoy listening to. It helps that on a number of the songs the band have gone back to their blues roots, and by mixing those with some fine rockers it makes for an album which sits nicely between 'Steel Wheels' and 'Voodoo Lounge', and which some people (not necessarily me) might say is even better than one or the other of those two. 



Track listing    

01 Jump On Top Of Me (b-side of 'You Got Me Rocking' 1994)
02 Wish I'd Never Met You (b-side of 'Terrifying' 1989)
03 I'm Gonna Drive (b-side of 'Out Of Tears' 1994)
04 Ready Yourself (outtake 1989)
05 Fancyman Blues (b-side of 'Mixed Emotions' 1989 - extended version)
06 So Young (b-side of 'Love Is Strong' 1994)
07 Cook Cook Blues (b-side of 'Rock And A Hard Place' 1989)
08 The Storm (b-side of 'Love Is Strong' 1994)
09 You Got It Made (outtake 1994 - Keef vocal)
10 For Your Precious Love (outtake 1989)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Tuesday, 10 September 2019

Robert Wyatt - The Unknown Zone (2009)

Throughout the early years of the new century Robert Wyatt continued to help out musicians who came to him for help with their music, as well as friends who just wanted to play with him, including Paul Weller on a duet of the Warren/Dublin classic 'September In The Rain', which was added to the 1997 Japanese re-release of Wyatt's 'Shleep' album. 'Afghanistan's A Country....' and DondestA' are reworkings of two Wyatt compositions by Jean-Michel Marchetti for the companion CD to his book 'M4W', while 'Flies' is Wyatt's contribution to the Various Artists compilation 'Plague Songs', consisting of music based around the twelve plagues of Egypt, with Wyatt and Brian Eno interpreting the plague of flies. The title track was recorded by Wyatt, Brian Eno and Phil Manzanera, following a jam session that occurred when the three of them had dinner after recording sessions for Wyatt's 'Cuckooland' album, and the resulting track was offered as a free download in 2009. We close with two songs from an artist previously unknown to me, Monica Vasconcelos, but after hearing these tracks I will be searching out more from her. If there's one thing that strikes you about these two albums it's the sheer variety of music that Wyatt has made during his career, starting with the psychedelic Soft Machine, the jazz-rock of Matching Mole, forays into the charts with 'I'm A Believer' and 'Yesterday Man', his own superlative singer/songwriter efforts on 'Rock Bottom' and 'Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard' among others, the definitive recording of 'Elvis Costello's 'Shipbuilding', and now all of this music with other musicians, young and old. He truly is a renaissance man in the field of music, and you can see why he's held in such high esteem by his peers. The cover of this one is based on an acrylic painting by Sian Superman of Raw Art.



Track listing

01 September In The Rain (...with Paul Weller, from the Japanese release of 'Shleep' 1997)
02 Afghanistan's A Country....... (...with Jean-Michel Marchetti, from 'M4W' 2003)
03 DondestA (...with Jean-Michel Marchetti, from 'M4W' 2003)
04 The Unknown Zone (...with Brian Eno and Phil Manzanera, free download 2009)
05 The Plague Of Flies (...with Brian Eno, from 'Plague Songs' 2006) 
06 Before We Knew (...with Annie Whitehead, from 'The Gathering' 2000)
07 Out Of The Doldrums (...with Monica Vasconcelos, from 'Hih' 2008)
08 Still In The Dark (...with Monica Vasconcelos, from 'Hih' 2008)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Sunday, 8 September 2019

Monty Python - The Self-Abasement Tapes (2019)

As part of a celebration of 50 years of Monty Python's Flying Circus, BBC Radio 4 have compiled a collection of rare and previously unheard sketches and songs, all linked together by Michael Palin, in his search far and wide for these lost recordings. There are five 15-minutes shows, which I've edited together into one hour long file, and it includes adverts for their albums and films, rejected sketches and songs, and a recording of a script read-through from 2014. 
On the 5th October the anniversary will also be marked by a world record attempt, in which organisers are hoping to encourage the largest gathering of people dressed as Gumbys - the spectacle-wearing, knotted handkerchief-sporting imbeciles who became part of Python lore. Although a lot of these pieces would have been rejected for a reason - not enough room, not funny enough - there's enough good stuff here to satisfy even the most ardent Python fan.



Track listing

Fat Ignorant Bastards
Courtroom Sketch
'Lumberjack Song' advert
School sketch
'I'm So Worried' song
'The Holy Grail' trailers
'Sir Robin's Song' with extra verse
Terry Jones and Michael Palin revisit the Scottish shooting locations for 'The Holy Grail'
'King Arthur' song
The Martyrdom of St. Brian
'Life Of Brian' soundtrack album advert
'Life Of Brian' film adverts
'Life Of Brian' voice-over sketch
Otto sketch from 'Life Of Brian'
'The Meaning Of Life' song advertising the film
'The Accountancy Shanty' song
Goats Page
Madame Palm Writes
'Monty Python's Big Red Bok' interviews
'It's Christmas In Heaven' song (alternate version)
Stephen Hawking sings 'The Galaxy Song'
The team reads through the script for the 2014 reunion show at the O2, London
Charisma Records advert
'Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life' from the O2 reunion show
What Shall We Call The Show?

Enjoy / single file

Enjoy split file

Friday, 6 September 2019

Radiohead - Rainbow's End (2009)

When Radiohead self-released 'In Rainbows' in 2007 it was the first ever 'pay-what-you-want' download by a major act, after their recording contract with EMI ended with their 2003 album 'Hail to the Thief'. The band has been working on the record for more than two years, beginning in early 2005, and in 2006, after initial recording sessions with new producer Spike Stent proved fruitless, the band toured Europe and North America performing the new material. After re-enlisting longtime producer Nigel Godrich, Radiohead eventually recorded the album in a number of studios in London and Oxfordshire, with the songs incorporating a variety of musical styles and instruments, including electronics, strings, piano, and the ondes Martenot.
The album had a physical release in December 2007 on XL records, and made number one in the UK Albums Chart and the US Billboard 200, selling over three million copies worldwide by October 2008. There was also a limited edition box set which included 'In Rainbows' on vinyl and CD, as well as a bonus CD of eight additional songs, and two years later the bonus disc was made available for download from the band's website, making the extra tracks more readily available to the fans. These songs added up to the equivalent of a 25 minute EP, but I wanted to expand this to album length, and so added in a few tracks which were either recorded around the same time as the original 'In Rainbows' sessions, or at the time that the re-issue appeared in 2009. I've therefore added the reknowned, but now extremely hard to find, Flying Lotus remix of 'Reckoner', plus their contribution to the 'Help!' charity album, both from 2007, and the two download only singles that they released in 2009. All of the songs are very much in the style of the parent album, and so this hangs together pretty well as a companion disc to the original release. 



Track listing

01 MK 1 ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
02 Down Is The New Up ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
03 Go Slowly ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
04 MK 2 ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
05 These Are My Twisted Words (free download single 2009)
06 Last Flowers ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
07 Up On The Ladder ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
08 Harry Patch (In Memory Of) (download single 2009)
09 I Want None Of This (from 'Help! A Day In The Life' charity album 2007)
10 Bangers + Mash ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)
11 Reckoner (Flying Lotus Remix 2007)
12 4 Minute Warning ('In Rainbows' box set 2007)

Enjoy / Enjoy