Friday, 29 March 2019

Neil Young & Crazy Horse - Odeon:Budokan (1976)

I've mentioned before that I don't tend to post live albums on the site, but this is an exception as it was supposed to be released by Young himself, but like so many of his proposed releases it seems to have fallen by the wayside. The idea was to take concert recordings from his 1976 world tour with Crazy Horse and put together a live record of it, and it was eventually decided to take the songs from gigs at the Budokan Hall in Japan and the Hammersmith Odeon in the UK. The concerts consisted of an acoustic half and an electric half, and so a  mixture of each was to be taken from the recordings, and for many years it wasn't known which songs would be picked until, a few years ago, a video emerged on Youtube of edited video footage from both shows entitled 'Yesteryear Of The Horse' (still available here if you want to watch it), and so I've used that as a basis for the track listing that I've gone with. I've sourced the material from bootleg recordings rather than ripping the Youtube video as it gave better sound quality, and I've tried to edit the songs together to make a seamless live set, although you will notice a difference in the ambiance of the two venues. You can see why Young had considered releasing this as a live album, as it does contain some unique versions of his songs, such as 'Mellow My Mind' and 'Human Highway' with banjo accompaniment, piano versions of 'No One Seems To Know' and 'Stringman' (there's a bit of mic rubbing, but it was only played the once in London), and the band's first attempt at a live take of 'Country Home'. There has been talk recently of this album still being on the cards for an official release, but we've heard that so often before that I thought I'd post a copy now anyway, just in case that comes to nothing. 



Track listing

01 Tell Me Why
02 Stringman
03 Human Highway
04 Down By The River
05 Cortez The Killer
06 Mellow My Mind
07 Too Far Gone
08 No One Seems To Know
09 Country Home
10 Don't Cry No Tears
11 Cowgirl In The Sand
12 Lotta Love
13 The Losing End 
14 Drive Back

Track 1 Hammersmith Odeon, London  29th March 1976
Tracks 2 - 5 Hammersmith Odeon, London  31st March 1976
Tracks 6 - 14 Budokan Hall, Tokyo  11th March 1976

Enjoy

Manfred Mann's Earth Band - Can't Eat Meat (1987)

Following the hiccup with the aborted release of their proposed first album 'Stepping Sideways', Manfred Mann's Earth Band eventually issued their eponymous debut in 1972, and although I've always considered them to be primarily an albums band, they did release a number of singles, having their first hit in 1973 with 'Joybringer', based on the melody of 'Jupiter' from Gustav Holst's 'The Planets Suite'. They followed this a few years later with covers of two Bruce Springsteen songs, 'Spirits In The Night' and 'Blinded By The Light', giving them their biggest chart success, and the latter was also their breakthrough release in the US, kick-starting a long and successful career in that country. Generally b-sides were plucked from the then current album, but a couple of their singles were treated to exclusive songs, and they even released a few stand-alone singles, such as their cover of 'I (Who Have Nothing)' in 1981, and in 1983, a cover of Ian Thomas's 'Runner', which had been written in tribute to cancer sufferer Terry Fox and his run across Canada for cancer awareness, which sadly took him before he finished. Despite having a number of gifted songwriters in the band, most of their chart success seemed to be with cover versions, with 'For You' being another Springsteen song, and 'Redemption' Song' coming from the pen of Bob Marley. Despite this, they usually made the songs their own, with 'Blinded By The Light' and 'Spirits In The Night' being considered the definitive versions. This collection spans over a decade of their single releases, and includes three of those stand-alone singles, a number of rare b-sides, and an unreleased take of 'Joybringer', which shows the song in a completely different light.       



Track listing

01 Can't Eat Meat (b-side of 'Joybringer' 1973)
02 Joybringer (unreleased version 1974)
03 Bouillabaisse (b-side of 'Davy's On The Road Again' 1978)
04 A Fool Am I (b-side of 'For You' 1980)
05 I (Who Have Nothing) (single 1981)
06 Man In A Jam (b-side of 'I (Who Have Nothing)')
07 Rebel (single 1983)
08 War Dream (b-side of 'Redemption Song' 1982)
09 Holiday's Dream (b-side of 'Eyes Of Nostradaus' 1982)
10 Two Friends (From Mars & Saturn) (b-side of 'Geronimo's Cadillac' 1987)
11 Runner (single 1983)

Enjoy

The Rolling Stones - It's Only Goats Head Soup...But We Like It (1974)

While recording their 70's albums The Rolling Stones often taped more songs than were needed, and once the final track listing was decided on these songs were filed away, eventually leaking out on bootleg CD's many years later. Their most prolific period seemed to have been between 1972 and 1974, more specifically during the recording of their 'It's Only Rock 'n' Roll' and 'Goats Head Soup' albums, and so here we have alternate mixes, extended takes and unreleased songs from those sessions. Some of the tracks seem to be dubbed from acetates so they can be a bit scratchy, but it's worth overlooking that to hear these songs before they were polished for their respective albums.  
As this is an actual CD that I found online and which needs a wider exposure, I've included front and back covers, and also full information about each song in the file. 



Track listing

01. It's Only Rock 'n' Roll (rough mix)
02. Ain't Too Proud To Beg (alternate mix)
03. Winter (alternate mix)
04. Silver Train (alternate mix)
05. Drift Away (unreleased song)
06. Time Waits For No One (long version)
07. Criss Cross Man (unreleased song)
08. Through The Lonely Nights (1974 b-side only)
09. Living In The Heart Of Love (unreleased song)
10. Too Many Cooks (Spoil The Broth) (unreleased Mick Jagger solo single) 
11. Angie (rough mix without reverb & 2nd keyboard overdub)
12. Dance Little Sister (alternate mix)
13. Till The Next Goodbye (alternate mix)
14. If You Can't Rock Me (alternate mix)
15. Fingerprint File (alternate longer mix)

Tracks 1,2,5,6,12,13,14,15 are 'It's Only Rock 'n' Roll' outtakes.
Tracks 3,4,7,8,11 are 'Goats Head Soup' outtakes.
Track 10 recorded at Record Plant,Los Angeles 1973.

Enjoy

Quatermass - Monster In Paradise (1974)

Quatermass only released one album, but it's long been regarded as a classic of the progressive rock era. The trio consisted of bass player and vocalist John Gustafson, keyboardist J. Peter Robinson and Mick Underwood on drums, and like Emerson Lake And Palmer from the same era, they were one of the very few bands to do without a lead guitarist. Underwood had previously played with Ritchie Blackmore in the Outlaws, while Gustafson had been a member of The Big Three and The Merseybeats. Underwood later became drummer with Episode Six, and was joined by Gustafson after Roger Glover left to join Deep Purple, so all the links were already in place for Ritchie Blackmore to suggest that Deep Purple record 'Black Sheep Of The Family' for their 'Stormbringer' album, but this idea was rejected and it eventually became the first song to be recorded by Blackmore's next band Rainbow. The Quatermass sound was very much a power trio with Hammond organ as the main instrument, although some tracks on the album were enhanced by classical strings, especially 'Laughin' Tackle', which included 16 violins, six violas, six cellos, and three double bass, all arranged by Robinson. Following the release of the album the band issued one more single 'One Blind Mice' / 'Punting', and then disbanded. 
They briefly reformed in 1974 for a US tour, playing songs from the album alongside new material, and 'Bluegaloo/Broken Chords/Scales' is a live recording from that tour. 'Afraid Not' is a rehearsal take from 1970, and 'Monster In Paradise/Up On The Ground' is another live recording, which isn't quite as good soundwise as the other live take, but is a quite astounding piece of music, and fans of the band who haven't already found this on Youtube really do need to hear it. There isn't a huge amount of spare material from the band so this collection isn't one of my best compilations, but they were such a great outfit that any scraps are worth hearing, and if you've never heard of them before then check out the 'Quatermass' album to hear one of the best ever progressive rock records. 



Track listing

01 One Blind Mice
02 Punting
03 Bluegaloo/Broken Chords/Scales
04 Afraid Not
05 Monster In Paradise/Up On The Ground/Monster In Paradise (Conclusion)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Tuesday, 26 March 2019

10cc - Roots (1973)

While researching 10cc for last week's post, I discovered that their story was even more convoluted than I'd ever imagined, and after reading about the member's varied pre-10cc careers it prompted another post, so although this one is a bit long and involved, do try to stick with it to the end as it's a really fascinating story.
Three of the founding members of 10cc were childhood friends in the Manchester area. As boys, Kevin Godley and Lol Creme knew each other, and Graham Gouldman and Godley attended the same secondary school. Their first recorded collaboration was in 1964, when Gouldman's band The Whirlwinds recorded the Lol Creme composition 'Baby Not Like You', as the B-side of their only single, 'Look At Me'. The Whirlwinds then changed members and name, becoming The Mockingbirds, including singer-guitarist Gouldman, bassist Bernard Basso and drummer Kevin Godley, and recorded five singles in 1965–66 without any success. In June 1967, Godley and Creme reunited and recorded a solitary single 'Seeing Things Green' / 'Easy Life' on UK CBS, under the name The Yellow Bellow Room Boom. In 1969 Gouldman took them to a Marmalade Records recording session, and owner Giorgio Gomelsky was impressed with Godley's falsetto voice and offered them a recording contract. In September 1969 Godley & Creme recorded some basic tracks at Strawberry Studios, with Stewart on guitar and Gouldman on bass, and the resultant single 'I'm Beside Myself' / 'Animal Song' was issued under the name of Frabjoy and Runcible Spoon. Gomelsky (an ex-manager of The Yardbirds) planned to market Godley & Creme as a duo, in the vein of Simon & Garfunkel, but plans for an album by Frabjoy and Runcible Spoon faltered when Marmalade ran out of funds. However, solo tracks by Godley and Gouldman were released on a 1969 Marmalade Records music sample album '100 Proof'. Gouldman's track was 'The Late Mr. Late' and Godley's was 'To Fly Away', later reappearing as 'Fly Away' on the debut Hotlegs album 'Thinks: School Stinks'. Gouldman, meanwhile, had made a name for himself as a hit songwriter, penning 'Heart Full of Soul', 'Evil Hearted You' and 'For Your Love' for The Yardbirds, 'Look Through Any Window' and 'Bus Stop' for The Hollies, and 'No Milk Today', 'East West' and 'Listen People' for Herman's Hermits. At the same time the fourth future member of 10cc was also tasting significant pop music success, as guitarist Eric Stewart was a member of Wayne Fontana and the Mindbenders, a group that hit No.1 with 'The Game of Love', and also scored a number of other mid-1960s hits. When Fontana left the band in October 1965, the group became known simply as The Mindbenders, with Stewart as their lead vocalist, and the band scored another big hit with 'A Groovy Kind of Love' in 1965. In March 1968, Gouldman joined Stewart in The Mindbenders, replacing bassist Bob Lang and playing on some tour dates. Gouldman also wrote two of the band's last three singles, 'School Girl' in 1967 and 'Uncle Joe The Ice Cream Man' in 1968, neither of which bothered the charts.
In the dying days of The Mindbenders, Stewart began recording demos of new material at Inner City Studios, a Stockport studio then owned by Peter Tattersall, a former road manager for Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas. In July 1968, Stewart joined Tattersall as a partner in the studio, where he could further hone his skills as a recording engineer. In October 1968, the studio was moved to bigger premises and renamed Strawberry Studios, after The Beatles' 'Strawberry Fields Forever'. In 1969, Gouldman also began using Strawberry Studios to record demos of songs he was writing for Marmalade, as he had become much more in demand as a songwriter than as a performer, and by the end of the year he too was a financial partner in the studios. By 1969, all four members of the original 10cc line-up were working together regularly at Strawberry Studios. Around the same time, noted American bubblegum pop writer-producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeffry Katz of Super K Productions came to England and commissioned Gouldman to write and produce formula bubblegum songs, many of which were recorded at Strawberry Studios, and were either augmented or performed entirely by varying combinations of the future 10cc line-up. Among the recordings from this period was 'Sausalito (Is The Place To Go)', a No. 86 US hit credited to Ohio Express and released in July 1969. In fact the song featured Gouldman on lead vocal, with vocal and instrumental backing by the other three future 10cc members. In December 1969, Kasenetz and Katz agreed to a proposal by Gouldman that he work solely at Strawberry, rather than move constantly between Stockport, London and New York. Gouldman convinced the pair that these throwaway two-minute songs could all be written, performed and produced by him and his three colleagues, Stewart, Godley and Creme, at a fraction of the cost of hiring outside session musicians, and Kasenetz and Katz booked the studio for three months. The three-month project resulted in a number of tracks that appeared under various band names owned by Kasenetz-Katz, including 'There Ain't No Umbopo' by Crazy Elephant, 'When He Comes' by Fighter Squadron and 'Come On Plane' by Silver Fleet, all three with lead vocals by Godley. When the three-month production deal with Kasenetz-Katz ended, Gouldman returned to New York to work as a staff songwriter for Super K Productions and the remaining three continued to dabble in the studio. With Gouldman absent, Godley, Creme and Stewart continued recording singles. The first, 'Neanderthal Man', began life as a test of drum layering at the new Strawberry Studios mixing desk, but when released as a single by Fontana Records under the name of Hotlegs in 1970 it climbed to No. 2 in the UK charts and became a worldwide hit, selling more than two million copies. Around the same time, the trio released 'Umbopo' under the name of Doctor Father, being a slower, longer and more melancholic version of the track earlier released under the name of Crazy Elephant. Reverting to the successful band name Hotlegs, in early 1971 Godley, Creme and Stewart recorded the album 'Thinks: School Stinks', which included the hit 'Neanderthal Man', and then recalled Gouldman for a short tour supporting The Moody Blues, before releasing a follow-up single 'Lady Sadie' / 'The Loser', following which Philips reworked their sole album by removing 'Neanderthal Man' and adding 'Today', and re-issuing it as 'Song'. The band also continued outside production work at Strawberry Studios, working with Dave Berry, Wayne Fontana, Peter Cowap and Herman's Hermits, and doing original compositions for various UK football teams such as Manchester United. In 1971 they produced and played on Space Hymns, an album by New Age musician Ramases, and in 1972–73 they co-produced and played on two Neil Sedaka albums, 'Solitaire' and 'The Tra-La Days Are Over'. It was Neil Sedaka's success that prompted the four musicians to try to make it on their own merits, and the germ of 10cc was born. Once again a four-piece, the group recorded a Stewart/Gouldman song, 'Waterfall' in early 1972, and Stewart offered the acetate to Apple Records, but ended up waiting for months before receiving a note from the label saying the song was not commercial enough to release as a single. Undeterred by Apple's rejection, the group decided to plug another song which had been written as a possible B-side to 'Waterfall', a Godley/Creme composition entitled 'Donna'. The song was a Frank Zappa-influenced 1950s doo-wop parody, a sharp mix of commercial pop and irony with a chorus sung in falsetto, and the rest, as they say, is history.  



Track listing

01 Baby Not Like You (Creme) - The Whirlwinds (Gouldman) 1964
02 Seeing Things Green (Godley/Creme) - The Yellow Bellow Room Boom 1967
03 Easy Life (Godley Creme) - The Yellow Bellow Room Boom 1967
04 School Girl (Gouldman) - The Mindbenders (Stewart/Gouldman) 1967
05 Uncle Joe The Ice Cream Man (Gouldman) - The Mindbenders (Stewart/Gouldman) 1968
06 I'm Beside Myself (Godley/Creme) - Frabjoy And Runcible Spoon 1969
07 Animal Song (Godley/Creme) - Frabjoy And Runcible Spoon 1969
08 The Late Mr Late (Gouldman) - Graham Gouldman 1969
09 To Fly Away (Godley) - Kevin Godley 1969
10 Sausalito (Is The Place To Go) (Gouldman) - The Ohio Express (10cc) 1969
11 There Ain't No Umbopo (Godley/Creme) - Crazy Elephant (10cc) 1970
12 Neanderthal Man (Godley/Creme/Stewart) - Hotlegs (Godley/Creme/Stewart) 1970
13 Roll On (Godley/Creme/Stewart) - Doctor Father (Godley/Creme/Stewart) 1970
14 Umbopo (Godley/Creme) - Doctor Father (Godley/Creme/Stewart) 1970
15 When He Comes (Gouldman/Katz/Kasenetz) - Fighter Squadron (10cc) 1971
16 Come on Plane (Gouldman/Katz/Kasenetz) - Silver Fleet (10cc) 1971
17 Today (Godley/Creme) - Festival (10cc) 1972
18 Warm Me (Stewart/Gouldman) - Festival (10cc) 1972
19 Have You Ever Been To Georgia (Gouldman) - Garden Odyssey (10cc) 1972
20 The Joker (Gouldman/Greenfield) - Garden Odyssey (10cc) 1972
21 Travellin' Man (Gouldman) - Tristar Airbus (10cc) 1972
22 Pig Bin An' Gone (Godley/Creme/Stewart/Gouldman) - Grumble (10cc) 1973

Enjoy / Enjoy 

Friday, 22 March 2019

Manfred Mann's Earth Band - Stepping Sideways (1971)

From the beginnings of the Mann-Hugg Blues Brothers, to Manfred Mann the pop group, and later with the jazz-rock of Manfred Mann Chapter III, keyboardist Manfred Mann has built up a following with a repertoire of blues, pop,  experimental jazz rock, and eventually progressive rock with his Earth Band. Manfred Mann Chapter III started in 1969, but the group only lasted two years and broke up in 1971, when Mann wanted to move in a more rock-orientated direction and formed Manfred Mann’s Earth Band. The band started recording in 1971, and released their first two singles, covers of Randy Newman's 'Living Without You' and Dylan's 'Please Mrs. Henry', as by Manfred Mann, but all subsequent releases were credited to the Earth Band. They'd more or less finished recording the album when the group’s music started to change while touring, and Mann decided to shelve this version of the album and start again. What changed was the style of music, which became more electric and less acoustic, and Mann decided that this album was not representative of what the new band was playing live. Test pressings of the album had already been pressed, and people who heard it later were of the opinion that many of the 'Stepping Sideways' tracks are as good as much of what ended up on the Earth Band’s official debut. I've put this album together using the track listing from the test pressings, and added in the 'Please Mrs. Henry' single. The tracks which did eventually end up on the released debut album are the same versions as on that release.



Track listing

01 Ned Kelly
02 Ashes To The Wind
03 Part Time Man
04 Living Without You
05 Jump Sturdy
06 California Coastline
07 Ain't No Crime
08 Please Mrs. Henry
09 Holly Holy
10 Tribute

Enjoy / Enjoy

10cc - Hot Sun Rock (1978)

10cc achieved their greatest commercial success in the 1970s, although they'd been around for a number of years before that, plying their trade as jobbing songsmiths and session musicians. The band initially consisted of four musicians – Graham Gouldman, Eric Stewart, Kevin Godley, and Lol Creme – who had written and recorded together in various partnerships for about five years before assuming the name 10cc in 1972. The band featured two songwriting teams, one 'commercial' and one 'artistic'. Stewart and Gouldman were predominantly pop songwriters, who created most of the band's accessible songs. By way of contrast, Godley and Creme were the predominantly experimental half of 10cc, featuring an 'art school' sensibility and cinematically-inspired writing. Every member of the group was a multi-instrumentalist, singer, writer and producer, and the writing teams frequently switched partners, so that Godley/Gouldman or Creme/Stewart compositions were not uncommon. With such a wealth of songwriting talent on board, it's no wonder that there were a surfeit of songs recorded at their own Strawberry Studios, and so most of their early singles had a non-album track on the flip. This collection is made up of b-sides of their singles between 1972 and 1978. 



Track listing

01 4% Of Something (b-side of 'Johnny, Don't Do It!' 1972)
02 Hot Sun Rock (b-side of 'Donna' 1972)
03 Speed Kills (b-side of 'Headline Hustler' 1973)
04 Bee In My Bonnet (b-side of 'The Dean And I' 1973)
05 Waterfall (b-side of 'Rubber Bullets' 1973)
06 Gizmo My Way (b-side of 'The Wall Street Shuffle' 1974)
07 18 Carat Man Of Means (b-side of 'The Worst Band In The World' 1974)
08 Good News (b-side of 'I'm Not In Love' 1975)
09 Get It While You Can (b-side of 'Art For Art's Sake' 1975)
10 Channel Swimmer (b-side of 'Life Is A Minestrone' 1975)
11 Hot To Trot (b-side of 'The Things We Do For Love' 1976)
12 Don't Squeeze Me Like Toothpaste (b-side of 'Good Morning Judge' 1977)
13 I'm So Laid Back I'm Laid Out (b-side of 'People In Love' 1977)
14 Nothing Can Move Me (b-side of 'Dreadlock Holiday' 1978)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Steely Dan - The Lost Gaucho (1980)

This bootleg of out-takes from the 'Gaucho' sessions is fairly freely available online, but I was listening to it again recently, and though that it was just so good that I had to post it here for Steely Dan fans who haven't yet heard these songs. When the band went into the studio to record tracks for 1980's 'Gaucho' they laid down enough songs to almost make a double album, but it was trimmed down to a single record, and the left-over songs were filed away. They eventually leaked online, and a 2 CD set soon appeared, with a mixture of completed new and unheard songs, alongside demos of other tracks, some of which eventually made the album. The completed songs are superb sound quality, and included an early version of 'Third World Man' with different lyrics called 'Were You Blind That Day', and a lovely instrumental take of the title track. The demos weren't quite as good sound-wise, so I've taken all of the new songs and added just two of the demos, as 'I Can't Write Home About You' was another new song, unavailable elsewhere, and 'The Second Arrangement II' is a full band version of one of the earlier songs. This makes a nice 47 minute companion album to the original 'Gaucho', and if there are any Dan fans out there who haven't heard this yet then you're in for a treat.    



Track listing

01 Kind Spirit
02 Were You Blind That Day
03 If You Got The Bear
04 The Second Arrangement
05 Talkin' About My Home
06 I Can't Write Home About You
07 Kulee Baba
08 Time Out Of Mind
09 Gaucho
10 The Second Arrangement II


Donna Summer - Winter In MacArthur Park (1979)

After I'd finished my first mix of Donna Summer's extended 12" singles I had over half a dozen songs left, three of which topped the 17 minute mark. I wanted to see if I could put together another mix, and particularly wanted to include her take on 'MacArthur Park', and one of my other faves in 'Winter Melody', so I picked three other shorter tracks to complement them, and so here's my second mix of Donna Summer's extended releases, which I've titled 'Winter In MacArthur Park'.



Track listing

01 Dim All The Lights / Deep Down Inside / Last Dance / Winter Melody / MacArthur Park

Enjoy / Enjoy

Tuesday, 19 March 2019

Frank Zappa - Son Of Hot Rats (1970)

Following the release of 'Uncle Meat' in 1969, Frank Zappa disbanded the Mothers Of Invention and put together a new band, retaining only Ian Underwood from the Mothers, and adding Max Bennett and Shuggie Otis on bass, John Guerin, Paul Humphrey and Ron Selico on drums, Don "Sugarcane" Harris and Jean-Luc Ponty on violin, and an uncredited Lowell George on rhythm guitar. Using these musicians 'Hot Rats' was recorded between July 18 and August 30 1969 at TTG Studios in Hollywood. Because they were using new 16-track technology, only a few musicians were required to create an especially rich instrumental texture which gives the sound of a large group. It was this use of advanced overdubbing that was the main motivation for Zappa, who hated playing in a studio, and so the band were able to lay down basic tracks and Zappa would then tinker with them, speeding up and slowing down the tapes to create unusual effects. There was therefore more music taped than was needed for a single album, but never one to waste anything, Zappa used a lot of it on his later albums.
The opening to 'Toads of the Short Forest' from 'Weasels Ripped My Flesh', 'Twenty Small Cigars' from 'Chunga's Revenge', 'Excentrifugal Forz' (with overdubs done in 1973) from 'Apostrophe (')', and 'Lemme Take You To The Beach' from 'Studio Tan' were all taped at these sessions. Other songs, such as 'L'il Clanton Shuffle' and 'Bognor Regis' were released posthumously, the former on 'The Lost Episodes', and 'Bognor Regis' only on bootleg (which is ridiculous, as it's brilliant). The band stayed together for only a year, but in March 1970 they added Aynsley Dunbar on drums and laid down two more tracks, 'Sharleena' and 'Chunga Basement', and so this potential follow-up to the classic 'Hot Rats' includes everything that this incarnation of the band recorded in the studio. Normally I can take or leave Zappa, but 'Hot Rats' is one of my favourite ever albums, and as this collection is in a similar vein (with just a little more vocal), I think it hangs together really well. I've had to make a few edits, extracting the beginning of 'Toads...' and seguing it into 'Excentrifugal Forz', giving a better fade to 'Twenty Small Cigars', and cutting 'Sharleena' before it starts to get weird, but the rest is as it was taped nearly 50 years ago. The cover is from the original photo-shoot by Andee Eye (nee Nathanson), who posted it on Facebook recently 'for a giggle'.



Track listing

01 Lemme Take You To The Beach
02 Bognor Regis
03 Twenty Small Cigars
04 Chunga Basement
05 Introducing The Toads Of The Short Forest>
06 Excentrifugal Forz
07 L'il Clanton Shuffle
08 Sharleena

Enjoy / Enjoy

Friday, 15 March 2019

Fanny - No Deposit, No Return (1973)

I'm glad that my last post from Fanny had some positive comments, as they are one of the great unrecognised bands of the 70's, and so for the fans who still have fond memories of them, here's an album of previously unheard songs gathered from the 'First Time In A Long Time' box set. A little history is needed to put some of the songs into context, so it all started in high school, where the Millington sisters formed an all-female band called the Svelts with June on guitar, Jean on bass, Addie Lee on guitar, and Brie Brandt on drums. Brandt left to get married and was later replaced by Alice de Buhr. When the Svelts disbanded, de Buhr and Lee formed another all-female group called Wild Honey, and the Millingtons later joined this Motown covers band, and eventually moved to Los Angeles. Frustrated by a lack of success or respect in the male-dominated rock scene, Wild Honey decided to disband after one final open-mic appearance at the Troubadour Club in Los Angeles in 1969. They were spotted at this gig by the secretary of producer Richard Perry, who had been searching for an all-female rock band to mentor. Perry convinced Warner Bros. to sign Wild Honey to Reprise Records, with the group winning this contract without the label even hearing them play, on the grounds of being a novelty act. They did eventually prove their musical talent by recording an audition tape, and three of those tracks are here, along with a song from their informal recordings dubbed 'The Kitchen Tapes', and a number of out-takes from the sessions for their last three studio albums.   



Track listing

01 I Find Myself (Wild Honey audition tape 1969)
02 Queen Aretha (Wild Honey audition tape 1969)
03 Flame Tree (Wild Honey audition tape 1969)
04 Candlelighter Man (from the 'Kitchen Tapes')
05 Tomorrow (previously unreleased 1971)
06 Young And Dumb (previously unreleased 1972)
07 Lonesome Pine (previously unreleased 1973)
08 Beside Myself (previously unreleased 1973)
09 I'll Never Be The Same (previously unreleased 1973)
10 Old Milwaukee (previously unreleased 1973)
11 Back In My Arms Again (previously unreleased 1973)
12 'Till Then (previously unreleased 1973)
13 No Deposit, No Return (previously unreleased 1973)

Enjoy / Enjoy

The Cure - All Kinds Of Stuff (2008)

A very apt title for the final post in my Cure rarities series, as it includes a one-off single, some rare b-sides, a few album out-takes, a film soundtrack offering, and their contribution to a charity album. All kinds of stuff, in other words. 



Track listing

01 More Than This (from 'The X-Files: The Album' 1998)
02 Possession (previously unreleased song from the 'Bloodflowers' sessions 2000)
03 Coming Up (extra track on the Japanese/Australian versions of 'Bloodflowers' 2000)
04 Just Say Yes (single 2002)
05 Why Can't I Be Me (b-side of 'alt.end' and 'Taking Off' singles 2004)
06 Your God Is Fear (b-side of 'alt.end' and 'Taking Off' singles 2004)
07 Love (from the Amnesty International album 'Instant Karma' 2007)
08 Down Under (b-side of 'Sleep When I'm Dead' 2008)
09 All Kinds Of Stuff (b-side of 'Freakshow' 2008)
10 NY Trip (b-side of 'The Only One' 2008)
11 Without You (b-side of 'The Perfect Boy' 2008)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Bauhaus - Sevens (1983)

The second of my Bauhaus posts consists of their stand-alone 7" singles and b-sides from 1979 to 1983, plus a few choice out-takes.They apparently recorded quite a few tracks while in the studio to lay down the classic 'Bela Lugosi's Dead', and the ones which weren't released at the time have finally surfaced some forty years later, so I've included a couple of them here. I've omitted the original recording of 'Boys' as a version of that was on the previous post, and if I'm honest 'Some Faces' isn't really that great, but it's worth at least one hearing, as is the distinctly odd 'Dave And Danny's Waspie Dub #2' which closes the album.   



Track listing

01 Dark Entries (Axis single 1980)
02 Untitled (b-side of 'Dark Entries')
03 Some Faces (from the 'Bela Lugosi's Dead' sessions 1979)
04 Bite My Hip (from the 'Bela Lugosi's Dead' sessions 1979)
05 Terror Couple Kill Colonel (single 1980)
06 Scopes (b-side of 'Terror Couple Kill Colonel')
07 Terror Couple Kill Colonel 2 (b-side of Terror Couple Kill Colonel')
08 Monkey (Poison Pen) (previously unreleased 1981)
09 Satori (b-side of 'Kick In The Eye' 1981)
10 1-2-3-4 (b-side of 'The Passion Of Lovers' 1981)
11 Lagartija Nick (single 1983)
12 Paranoia, Paranoia (b-side of 'Lagartija Nick')
13 The Sanity Assassin (single 1983)
14 Spirit In The Sky (b-side of 'The Sanity Assassin')
15 Dave And Danny's Waspie Dub #2 (previously unreleased 1981)


Tuesday, 12 March 2019

The Action - In My Dream (1968)

The Action are generally regarded as one of those UK 60's bands that should have been huge, but just never had the breaks, and so have become a footnote in the history of British r'n'b. The band was formed as The Boys in August 1963, with original members Reg King (lead vocals), Alan 'Bam' King (rhythm guitar, vocals), Mike 'Ace' Evans (bass guitar, vocals) and Roger Powell (drums). They had a brief spell as a bar band in Germany, and then as a backing band for Sandra Barry, playing on her single 'Really Gonna Shake' in 1964. After the stint with Barry, Pete Watson was recruited as lead guitarist, and in 1964 they changed their name to The Action. Shortly after their name change, they signed to Parlophone with producer George Martin and released five singles between 1965 and 1967, none of which achieved success in the UK Singles Chart. After disastrous experiences with the Rikki Farr management, Peter Watson left the band in 1966, and they continued as a quartet, but were dropped from Parlophone in 1967. Following this setback, Reg King left the band, and Alan King took over as lead vocalist. They carried on recording demos during 1967 and 1968, but these were consigned to the vaults and lay unheard until they were exhumed for the 'Brain' album in 1995, and then again for 'Rolled Gold' two years later. This was when people started to realise what a great, neglected band they were, as the songs were all superb late 60's psychedelia, and I'm sure that an album with these on would have been a huge commercial success if anyone had released it at the time. The band are being re-evaluated again at the moment with the release of the 'Shadows And Reflections' 4CD box set of their complete recordings, but these are the songs that their reputation has been built on, and so this is the album that they could have released in 1968 if Parlophone had had just a little more faith in them. 



Track listing

01 Love Is All
02 In My Dream
03 Really Doesn't Matter
04 Little Boy
05 Things You Cannot See
06 Strange Roads
07 Brain
08 Something To Say
09 Follow Me
10 Icarus
11 I'm A Stranger
12 Climbing Up The Wall
13 Look At The View
14 Come Around

Enjoy / Enjoy

Zippyshare update

Thanks to http://ezhevika.blogspot.com/ for providing this VPN Browsec VPN which works perfectly. If you use Opera then try this one Opera Free VPN. I'll carry on posting with Zippyshare and Mega.nz in case the VPN doesn't work for you.

Saturday, 9 March 2019

Fanny - Fanny (Canadian edition) 1971

Fanny are often cited as being the first all-female rock band, and while that might be arguable, they were certainly one of the first all-girl bands to write their own material and rock out with the best of their male counterparts. The four original members of Fanny were sisters June Millington (guitar, vocals) and Jean Millington (bass, vocals), with Alice de Buhr (drums, vocals), and Nickey Barclay (keyboards, vocals). June and Nickey were the primary songwriters for the band, but Jean and Alice made significant contributions to their repertoire and all four participated in arranging the songs and crafting their stage performances. Some of the biggest music stars of the time, from David Bowie to Deep Purple to George Harrison to the Kinks, were so blown away by these four teenaged rockers that they went out of their way to promote the band and to book them as an opening act. In fact Bowie was quoted in 1999 as saying 'One of the most important female bands in American rock has been buried without a trace. And that is Fanny. They were one of the finest fucking rock bands of their time, in about 1973. They were extraordinary: They wrote everything, they played like motherfuckers, they were just colossal and wonderful, and nobody’s ever mentioned them. They’re as important as anybody else who’s ever been, ever; it just wasn’t their time. Revivify Fanny. And I will feel that my work is done'. 
They were also the first all female rock act to record a whole album for a major record label, with Reprise releasing the 'Fanny' album in 1970. The band were soon back in the studio recording songs for the follow-up record, and at this point Reprise decided to release that first album in Canada. Tapes were duly sent off to the pressing plant, and it wasn't until the finished article was in the shops that someone noticed that the wrong tapes had been sent. Not only did they contain only a few songs from the debut, but they were mixed in with early versions of songs destined for their second album 'Charity Ball', and even some songs that have never since seen the light of day outside Canada. With the release of the 'First Time In A Long Time' box set, I was able to piece together this Canadian rarity, and it's certainly worth hearing even if you already have their first few albums. The cover is the reverse of the US edition, and the notes on the songs below are taken from the fannyrocks.com website.

Charity Ball (June Millington, Jean Millington, Alice de Buhr)
A shorter, sparser version of the song that would end up as the title track on ‘Charity Ball’, their second album.
Place in the Country (Nickey Barclay)
A slower paced, looser, funkier version of the song that would turn up on ‘Charity Ball’.
Changes (June Millington)
A rare June Millington up-tempo rocker boasting some interesting melodic ideas and a great harmonic lurch in the middle section. One of June’s best vocal performances, she really seems to be having fun. Shame this one was dropped from the US release.
One Step at a Time (Josephine Armstead, Nickolas Ashford, Valerie Simpson)
This gospel-tinged rocker was originally recorded by Maxine Brown in the mid 1960s and Fanny makes a good job of covering it by stripping it right down to its bare bones and punctuating it with powerfully pregnant pauses. The dual vocal lines are carefully handled and the whole effect is emotionally strong.
Conversation With a Cop (Nickey Barclay)
Same as the version on the US release.
Nowhere to Run (Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland)
This workmanlike rerun of Martha and the Vandellas’ old Motown hit is not the best cover Fanny has attempted and it is perhaps not surprising that it was dropped from the US release.
Seven Roads (June Millington, Jean Millington, Alice de Buhr)
A marginally different take to the version that appeared on the US release.
Take a Message to the Captain (Nickey Barclay)
Same as the version on the US release.
Come and Hold Me (June Millington, Jean Millington)
Same as the version on the US release.
Lady’s Choice (June Millington, Jean Millington)
The last two songs on this album are probably the most interesting. This one has a rhythmically complex melody asking much of Alice’s drumming and Jean’s bass playing. Both rise to the challenge and make this a standout track.
New Day (June Millington, Jean Millington)
A languid and fitting end to the album, this song is beautifully constructed and realized from the unusual melodic ideas and surprising harmonica break, to the loose-limbed play out where Nickey is given full rein to unleash her keyboard prowess. Alice’s jazz drumming and Jean’s walking bass add to the mood perfectly. One of the best songs on the album and should never have been left off the US release.



Track listing

01 Charity Ball
02 Place In The Country
03 Changes
04 One Step At A Time
05 Conversation With A Cop
06 Nowhere To Run
07 Seven Roads
08 Take A Message To The Captain
09 Come And Hold Me
10 Lady's Choice
11 New Day

Enjoy / Enjoy

AC/DC - R.I.P. (Rock In Peace) 1990

During the long career AC/DC didn't keep much in the vaults, and even the recent 'Backtracks' box set only managed to find a few rarities, including songs that featured on Australian-only releases, movie soundtracks, single b-sides and tour CDs. I've concentrated on just the b-sides, which span the whole of the band's lifestime from early singles in 1976, to a rare b-side from 2000, and the set is split pretty much 50/50 between the Scott and Johnson eras. 'Jailbait' is an excellent start to the album, although when 'Fling Thing' started I was a bit worried that they might have decided to tape novelty songs for the flips to their singles, but luckily it was a one-off, and obviously a tongue-in-cheek nod to their Scottish roots. The rest of the songs are what you'd expect from a band at the fore-front of the hard rock scene. 'Crabsody In Blue' is taken from early UK and Australian pressings of 'Let There Be Rock', before the record company started having second though about the subject matter (pubic lice) and removed it from future pressing. This was in fact the first album of theirs that I bought, so my old vinyl copy includes this disgraceful song! If there's one thing that this album shows, it's that once they found their sound they stuck with it for life, as apart from the vocalist you'd hardly be able to tell a 1976 song from a 1990 one. 



Track listing

01 Jailbreak (single 1976)
02 Fling Thing (b-side of 'Jailbreak')
03 Love Song (Oh Jene) (b-side of 'Baby, Please Don't Go' 1975)
04 R.I.P. (Rock In Peace) (b-side of 'Dirty Deeds Done Cheap' 1976)
05 Carry Me Home (b-side of 'Dog Eat Dog' 1977)
06 Crabsody In Blue (from UK and  Australian editions of 'Let There Be Rock' 1977)
07 Cold Hearted Man (b-side of 'Rock 'n' Roll Damnation' 1978)
08 Snake Eye (b-side of 'Heatseeker' 12" 1986)
09 Borrowed Time (b-side of 'That's The Way I Wanna Rock 'n' Roll' 12" 1988)
10 Down On The Borderline (b-side of 'Moneytalks' 1990)
11 Big Gun (single 1993)
12 Cyberspace (b-side of 'Safe In New York City' 2000)

The Cure - Cut Here (2005)

The penultimate volume of my Cure rarities posts takes us right up to 2001, and includes a  soundtrack only item, their contribution to a Depeche Mode tribute album, and  some choice b-sides. I've named this album after the 'Cut Here' single, as it's a nice anagram of the band's name, and I've adapted the sleeve of the single by adding a band picture.



Track listing

01 Home (b-side of 'Mint Car' 1996)
02 Waiting (b-side of 'Mint Car' 1996)
03 A Pink Dream (b-side of 'Mint Car' 1996) 
04 Dredd Song (from the 'Judge Dredd' soundtrack 1995)
05 It Used To Be Me (b-side of 'The 13th' 1996)
06 Ocean (b-side of 'The 13th' 1996)
07 Adonais (b-side of 'The 13th' 1996)
08 This Is A Lie (b-side of 'Gone!' 1996)
09 World In My Eyes (from the Depeche Mode tribute album 'For the Masses' 1998)
10 Cut Here (single 2001)
11 Signal To Noise (b-side of  'Cut Here')

Friday, 8 March 2019

Bauhaus - Twelves (1983)

A recent comment from Craig Cobalt prompted me to dig out a couple of Bauhaus albums that i'd put together from their non-album b-sides. There was enough material for two 40 minute albums and I was trying to decide how to sequence them - two discs in chronological order, split in half? - when it occurred to me that two of my very favourite tracks of theirs - 'Bela Lugosi's Dead' and 'Rose Garden Funeral Of Sores' - were on 12" singles, so I checked out some of their other 12"ers and found there were enough good songs on them to add to those two and make a great album. I've been a fan of the band since day one, and bought their Axis single 'Dark Entries' when it came out - later to become one of their rarest discs after the label changed it's name to 4AD and re-issued the single. I snapped up 'Bela Lugosi's Dead' as soon as I'd heard it on John Peel, and still think it stands up even today as one of the best ever indie singles. Their cover of John Cale's 'Rose Garden Funeral Of Sores' is a tour de force, and was the start of a penchant for covering eclectic songs like 'Telegram Sam', 'Ziggy Stardust', 'Third Uncle', 'Waiting For The Man', and 'Spirit In The Sky'. The b-sides of the 7" singles will be used for a later complementary post, so that both albums span the same time period of 1979 to 1983. The songs on this post are from the 'Bela Lugosi's Dead', 'Telegram Sam', 'Searching For Sartori', 'Ziggy Stardust' and 'She's In Parties' 12" singles.   



Track listing

01 Bela Lugosi's Dead
02 Boys
03 Untitled (Dark Entries)
04 Rose Garden Funeral Of Sores
05 Crowds
06 Kick In The Eye (Searching For Satori)
07 In Fear Of Dub
08 Harry
09 Earwax
10 Waiting For The Man (Live)
11 Departure
12 Here's The Dub

Enjoy / Enjoy

Thursday, 7 March 2019

TheAmplifiedReview


Now that I have a taste for blogging I've finally got around to moving my old website peterjolly.co.uk over to Blogger. I've posted record reviews and bits of humour on there since 2007, and have moved all of 2018's reviews to my new blog site TheAmplifiedReview. They're mostly indie releases, with the odd mainstream album thrown in there, and are published in a magazine called Amplified, hence the name of the blog. In each issue I also pick six new bands who've posted songs on Soundcloud that have taken my fancy, and each review includes a 90 second sample of their music. There's a link in my Recommended Sites on the right, so check it out, and I hope you find something that you like, and if you fancy a chuckle here's a link to the humour section, where I've collected the very best of internet humour from the last five years ha ha ha..

Tuesday, 5 March 2019

The Futureheads - Living In The Past (2006)

As soon as I heard the spikey post-punk sound of The Futureheads I knew that they would be a band that I'd grow to cherish. Their first album is a masterpiece of the genre, with fifteen short, sharp pieces of energetic post-punk, and including arguably the only Kate Bush cover that's surpassed the original, with 'Hounds Of Love'. From that point on I sought out everything that they released, and that was something of a mammoth task with the issue of their 'Decent Days And Nights' single, with its myriad formats and variety of b-sides. Their follow-up record 'News And Tributes' was another great album, with a slightly more mature sound, and the band continued to grow with the release of 'This Is Not The World' and 'The Chaos', until they issued their most ambitious album yet in 2012, with the acapella 'Rant'. Eschewing musical instruments, the whole record is composed of just voices, and despite how daunting that sounds, it really worked, and was a triumph. Around 2006 I decided to collect all those hard to find songs onto one CD, and as with the Arctic Monkeys and Laura Marling discs from previous posts, they then sat on my shelf for thirteen years before I decided to share them, so I hope that some of you will remember with affection this superb indie band, and will appreciate hearing songs that you might not have known existed.



Track listing

01 Ticket (from the '1-2-3.nul!' EP 2003)
02 Piece Of Crap (b-side of 'First Day' 2003)
03 A Picture Of Dorian Grey (from the '1-2-3.nul!' EP 2003)
04 Cabaret (from the '1-2-3.nul!' EP 2003)
05 Fit But You Know It (b-side of Mike Skinner & The Streets CD 2004)
06 Banquo (b-side of 'Decent Days And Nights' CD single 2005)
07 Boring The Children (b-side of Australian 'Decent Days And Nights' CD single 2005)
08 Balsh (b-side of 'First Day' 2003)
09 Appreciate The Effort (b-side of 'Decent Days And Nights' 2004)
10 Tearing Holes (from the '1-2-3.nul!' Promo EP 2003)
11 Park Inn (from the 'Nul Book Standard' EP 2002)
12 Remote Control (b-side of 'Decent Days And Nights' CD single 2004)
13 Area (single 2005)
14 Easy For Us (b-side of 'Skip To The End' 2006)
15 Help Us Out (b-side of 'Area')
16 We Cannot Lose (b-side of 'Area')
17 Outro (from the 'Nul Book Standard' EP 2002)

Enjoy