Friday, 31 May 2019

Roy Buchanan - Roy's Bluz (1971)

As promised, here is the second of Roy Buchanan's lost albums, with tracks recorded throughout 1970 and 1971, with one final out-take from 1972 to round it out. It's the  discarded reworking of T-Bone Walker's 'Stormy Monday' and the all too brief 'Jam' that may command listeners primary attention, each featuring some stunning guitar-work from Buchanan, while the early take of 'Sweet Dreams' is heart-wrenchingly beautiful. 'Roy's Bluz' burns with a simmering and scintillating groove, while the cover of Junior Walker's 'Shotgun' immediately lays down the law with Buchanan's blistering opening flurry. The medley pairing his reworking of his 1961 single 'After Hours' with 'The Messiah Will Come Again' arguably outshines the two respective versions that subsequently appeared on his first two official albums, and 'Dual Soliloquy' showcases Buchanan's expertise on both acoustic and electric guitars. It might not hold together quite as well as 'The Prophet', but fans of the guitarist still need to hear it. 



Track listing 

01 Stormy Monday
02 Sweet Dreams
03 Jam
04 Roy's Bluz
05 Dual Soliloquy
06 After Hours - The Messiah Will Come Again
07 Shotgun

Enjoy / Enjoy

Danger Mouse - The Grey Album (2004)

The Grey Album is one of the first and best-known mash-up albums, mixing a cappella versions of rapper Jay-Z's The Black Album with samples from The Beatles' 'The White Album'. It gained notoriety when EMI attempted to halt its distribution despite approval of the project from Jay-Z and the two surviving Beatles, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. It was created as an experimental project intended for a limited 3,000-copy release in February 2004, and while Danger Mouse never asked permission to use the Beatles' material, Jay-Z's a cappella recordings were released commercially for the purpose of encouraging mashups and remixes. The hype around The Grey Album caught the attention of Beatles' copyright holder EMI, who ordered Danger Mouse and retailers carrying the album to cease distribution. Music industry activist group Downhill Battle responded by coordinating Grey Tuesday, an electronic civil disobedience event held on 24 February 2004. Participating websites posted copies of The Grey Album for free download for a 24-hour period in protest of EMI's attempts to prevent distribution of the mashup on the grounds that sampling is fair use and that a statutory license should be provided in the same manner as if an artist were to perform or record a cover version of a song. Hundreds of web sites publicized the event with 170 hosting the album for download, and over 100,000 copies were downloaded on that day alone. The album was my introduction to Jay-Z, after downloading it purely for the Beatles' connection, and it pointed me in the direction of a genre that I'd never really explored before, so I'm thankful for that, as well as for the fact that it's a brilliant album in it's own right. This post is for anyone who hasn't already heard it, and if you are impressed enough to want more then there are other mash-ups out there, mixing Jay-Z's rapping with Prince for 'The Purple Album', as well as 'The Silver Album' by Bazooka Joe, 'The White Albulum' by DK Kno, and 'How To Remix The Black Album' by Jon Doe. 



Track listing

01 Public Service Announcement ('Long, Long, Long')
02 What More Can I Say ('While My Guitar Gently Weeps')
03 Encore ('Glass Onion', 'Savoy Truffle')
04 December 4th ('Mother Nature's Son')
05 99 Problems ('Helter Skelter', 'Wild Honey Pie')
06 Dirt Off Your Shoulder ('Julia')
07 Moment Of Clarity ('Happiness Is A Warm Gun')
08 Change Clothes ('Piggies')
09 Allure ('Dear Prudence')
10 Justify My Thug ('Rocky Raccoon')
11 Lucifer 9 (Interlude) ('Revolution 9', 'I'm So Tired')
12 My 1st Song ('Savoy Truffle', 'Can You Take Me Back')

Enjoy / Enjoy

The Golden Earrings - Sound Of The Screaming Day (1968)

To close my short series on 70's Dutch rock bands we have perhaps the best-known band from Holland after Focus. Golden Earring formed in The Hague in 1961 as the Golden Earrings (the definite article was dropped in 1967, while the 's' was dropped in 1969), and achieved worldwide fame with their international hit 'Radar Love' in 1973, reaching the top ten in the UK. But it had been a long journey to reach those heights, releasing numerous singles during the previous eight years, to little acclaim outside their native country. The Golden Earrings were formed by 13-year-old George Kooymans and his 15-year-old neighbor Rinus Gerritsen, and were originally called The Tornados, until they realised that the name was already taken by the 'Telstar' hitmakers, and so it was changed to the The Golden Earrings. Initially a pop-rock band with Frans Krassenburg on lead vocals and Jaap Eggermont on drums, they had chart success in Holland with their debut single 'Please Go', recorded in 1965, and following a change of recording venue to the Pye Records studios in London, they hit number 2 in the Dutch charts with 'That Day'. In 1967, Barry Hay replaced Krassenburg as lead vocalist, and the classic Earring line-up was in place. By 1968 their pop-rock sound had progressed to full-blown psychedelia, with the release of their 'Eight Miles High' album, featuring an 18-minute version of the title track, but this post examines the lead-up to that new direction, with all their non-album singles and b-sides, from that debut in 1965, to the first blossomings of psyche on 'Sound Of The Screaming Day' in 1967. As a bizarre interlude it also includes their version of the Coca Cola jingle 'Things Go Better', and it's similarly themed b-side, but they give it a professional make-over so it stays on the album.  



Track listing

01 Chunk Of Steel (b-side of 'Let's Go' 1965)
02 That Day (single 1966)
03 The Words I Need (b-side of 'That Day')
04 If You Leave Me (single 1966)
05 Waiting For You (b-side of 'If You Leave Me')
06 Daddy Buy Me A Girl (single 1966)
07 What You Gonna Tell (b-side of 'Daddy Buy Me A Girl')
08 Don't Run Too Far (single 1966)
09 Wings (b-side of 'Don't Run Too Far')
10 Things Go Better (single 1966)
11 Rum & Coca Cola (b-side of 'Things Go Better')
12 Sound Of The Screaming Day (single 1967)
13 She Won't Come To Me (b-side of 'Sound Of The Screaming Day')
14 Together We Live, Together We Love (single 1967)
15 I Wonder/Preview Together We Live And Love (b-side of 'Together We Live, Together We Love')
16 Remember My Friend (b-side of 'Just A Little Bit Of Peace In My Heart') 

Enjoy / Enjoy

Edgar Broughton Band - Freedom (1972)

The Edgar Broughton Blues Band started out playing to a small following in the region around their hometown of Warwick, but soon began to lean towards the emerging psychedelic movement and dropped the 'Blues' from their name as well as their music. In 1968 the band moved to Notting Hill Gate in London, seeking a recording contract and a wider audience, and were signed to EMI's progressive rock label Harvest Records that December. Their first single was 'Evil'/'Death Of An Electric Citizen', released in June 1969, and it was also the first single released by Harvest Records. It was quickly followed by their debut album 'Wasa Wasa', which was a heavily blues influenced record, that was hard-driven and propelled by Edgar Broughton's gritty vocal style. Their live performances were beset by controversy, with fights breaking out between audience members, leading to violent police intervention, and at a show in Keele the audience vandalized the venue using paint given to them by the band. They continued to record, releasing their live reworking of The Fugs' 'Out Demons, Out!' as a single in 1970, with it becoming the song that the band would forever be remembered for. The delicately-titled 'Up Yours!' followed, and their next single 'Apache Drop Out' combined The Shadows' 'Apache' with Captain Beefheart's 'Drop Out Boogie', and reached number 33 in the UK charts. 'Hotel Room'/'Call Me A Liar' was issued in 1971, and once again was not featured on the then current album. Following the success of their third album, the band relocated to Devon to begin recording for their next, 'In Side Out', and after that, their fifth release 'Oora' in 1972, but that was pretty much the end of the golden period for the Edgar Broughton Band, although they continued to release records into the early 80's. This post collects all of their non-album singles and b-sides from that early period, for a retrospective of one of the great British 'free-festival bands'. 



Track listing

01 Out Demons Out! (single 1970)
02 Rag Doll (previously unreleased 1970)
03 We've Got The Power (previously unreleased 1970)
04 Up Yours! (single 1970)
05 Apache Drop Out (single 1970)
06 Freedom (b-side of 'Apache Drop Out') 
07 Hotel Room (single 1971)
08 Call Me A Liar (b-side of 'Hotel Room')
09 Someone (b-side of 'Gone Blue' 1972)
10 Mr. Crosby (b-side of 'Gone Blue' 1972)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Tuesday, 28 May 2019

Roy Buchanan - The Prophet (1969)

Prior to garnering notoriety as 'The World's Greatest Unknown Guitarist', Roy Buchanan spent the 50's and early 60's as a band member for a number of R&B outfits, and served stints in both Dale Hawkins' and his Canadian cousin Ronnie Hawkins' respective combos. He even released a couple of singles in 1961, but it was during his time touring with Dale Hawkins that he first came to the attention of another rising performer named Charlie Daniels. They remained friends, and by the late 60's the two crossed paths professionally as Buchanan was placed in the care of Daniels, whose recent roster boasted production credits for the likes of Bob Dylan and Leonard Cohen. Buchanan's great love was playing live, but wasn't that interested in recording, and it wasn't until Polydor Records offered an advance large enough to cover the cost of recording an album that he agreed to do it. Even then he was happy just to turn up and play his guitar, with Daniels either composing or selecting all of the songs, as well as arranging them and even choosing the local musicians to accompany him. Because of Buchanan's reluctance to travel away from his regular club gigs in and around the Washington area, Daniels was only able to corral him long enough for a handful of studio dates in Nashville, but in that time he did record enough songs for a prospective album, although sessions dragged on until 1971, when the project was finally abandoned. The following year Buchanan tried again, and this time an album was released, to great acclaim, and his career got a second wind. The 1969 sessions were consigned to the vaults, until they turned up in 2004 as an archive release, which has now become quite hard to find. For this post I've taken the 1969 recordings and housed them in (I think) a better sleeve, and have kept back the 1971 songs for a later post. So here is what should have been Roy Buchanan's debut album in 1969, and it's good enough for us to say that if it had come out at the time then his solo career could well have started a good three years earlier than it did.



Track listing

01 Funky Junky
02 Black Autumn
03 Day And Age
04 There'll Always Be
05 Billy Joe Young
06 The Story Of Isaac
07 Baltimore
08 Sign On The Window
09 Humbug Down On The River
10 Pain
11 Desire You

Enjoy / Enjoy

Friday, 24 May 2019

Kaleidoscope - Egyptian Candy (1970)

The Kaleidoscope were formed in 1966 by David Lindley, Solomon Feldthouse, Chris Darrow, Chester Crill, and John Vidican. Lindley was an experienced performer on a variety of stringed instruments, notably the banjo, and he joined up with Feldthouse to begin performing as a duo, David and Solomon. They later met Chester Crill and invited him to join their band, and by the end of 1966 they'd added Darrow and Vidican, dropped the definite article, and become Kaleidoscope. The group was founded on democratic principles, with no leader, and they began performing live in clubs, winning a recording contract with Epic Records. The first single, 'Please', was released in December 1966, and their first album 'Side Trips' was issued the following year. It was produced by Barry Friedman, and showcased the group’s musical diversity and studio experimentation. It included Feldthouse's 'Egyptian Gardens', Darrow’s 'Keep Your Mind Open', and a cover of Cab Calloway's 'Minnie the Moocher', highlighting their unusual musical tastes and sense of humour. A lot of their music fused Middle-Eastern music with rock in longer pieces such as 'Taxim', and they soon became the go-to band for psychedelic festivals. They performed in many different styles, including rock, blues, folk and jazz, and their non-album singles are a good example of this diversity, which is why I've put together this album. As well as singles and b-sides, we also have a collaboration with Larry Williams and Johnny 'Guitar' Watson, and a couple of songs recorded in 1969 and gifted to Michelangelo Antonioni for use in his 'Zabriskie Point' film. The band split up shortly after supporting Cream on their farewell tour, but they left behind a body of work which sits up there with the very best of West Coast psychedelic music, so enjoy this collection of rare songs from throughout their career.



Track listing

01 Midnight Man (out-take from 'Side Trips' sessions 1967)
02 Why Try (single 1967)
03 Little Orphan Nannie (b-side of 'Why Try')
04 Elevator Man (b-side of 'Please' 1967)
05 Rampe Ranmpe (b-side of 'I Found Out' 1967)
06 Just A Taste (single 1968)
07 Egyptian Candy (previouosly unreleased 1968)
08 Nobody (single with Larry Williams & Johnny 'Guitar' Watson 1967)
09 Hello Trouble (b-side of 'Just A Taste')
10 Love Games (previously unreleased 1968)
11 Stefan (out-take from 'Incredible' sessions 1969)
12 Brother Mary (from Zabreskie Point' soundtrack 1970)
13 Mickey's Tune (from Zabreskie Point' soundtrack 1970)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Plainsong - Now We Are 3 (1972)

Plainsong was a short-lived folk-rock outfit with country-rock leanings that briefly provided a pretty close British equivalent to the likes of Crosby, Stills & Nash. Singer-songwriter Iain Matthews had been the frontman with Fairport Convention during their early West Coast-influenced period, and had subsequently enjoyed moderate success as a solo artist and with his pioneering British country-rock outfit Matthews Southern Comfort. His main collaborator in Plainsong was guitarist and multi-instrumentalist Andy Roberts, former musical kingpin of the loose collective of folk musicians and performance poets known as the Liverpool Scene. Rounding out the new band were bassist/pianist David Richards and Californian acoustic guitarist Bob Ronga, with percussion being provided on an ad-hoc basis by Iain’s former Fairport colleague Dave Mattacks or fellow folk-rock stalwart Timi Donald. 
Prior to their formation in early 1972 Roberts had become infatuated with the alternative version of the Amelia Earhart story propounded in Fred Goerner’s book 'The Search For Amelia Earhart', which suggested that she had been on a clandestine aerial spying mission for the US government on the Japanese at Saipan in 1937, and had perished at their hands, the whole affair then being hushed up to avoid an early war. Matthews became interested in the topic, but unable to stretch the concept to a whole album, they decided to record a short suite based on the story, and make it the centrepiece of their Elektra debut, which also took it's title from Goerner’s book. Despite it's mixture of self-penned songs and covers, and having the Earheart suite in the middle, it was a beautifully coherent folk-country-rock album with glorious vocals and superbly understated, largely acoustic accompaniment, with the occasional fiery Telecaster tail-twist. The whole record had a wistful, summery feel absolutely redolent of 1972, and it remains one of my favourite ever albums. Despite that, it failed to trouble the Top 100 album charts, and when Ronga left, the remaining members recorded a follow-up, provisionally titled 'Now We Are 3', which moved further towards country-rock, but this was shelved when the band split abruptly due to ferocious antipathy between Matthews and Richards, and Iain’s long-aspired determination to move to California. It has appeared as part of the deluxe re-issue of the debut album, but here it is for anyone who missed it, with some new cover art thrown in.



Track listing

01 Old Man At The Mill
02 Urban Cowboy
03 The Fault 
04 Swinging Doors 
05 Keep On Sailing 
06 Miss The Mississippi 
07 Home 
08 First Girl I Loved 
09 Save Your Sorrows 
10 Nobody Eats At Linebaugh's Any More
11 The Goodnight Lovin Trail 
12 All Around My Grandmothers Floor 
13 That's All It Could Amount To

Enjoy / Enjoy

Group 1850 - Mother No-Head (1971)

The next installment in of my series of classic Dutch rock of the 70's features Group 1850. The band started out in 1964 in The Hague, calling themselves The Klits, but were renamed Group 1850 in 1966 when their debut single, 'Misty Night' / 'Look Around', appeared on the tiny Yep label. Though few copies were pressed, it established them as one of The Netherlands' most original bands and they soon signed to Philips. More singles ensued, all in a highly psychedelic vein, and by the time they released their debut album 'Agemo's Trip To Mother Earth' in late 1968 they had a reputation of being one of the best European acid-rock bands. The label pushed the boat out on promoting the disc, with the Dutch version having a sleeve with a 3-D image on the cover, and coming with a pair of 3-D glasses. The album didn't do as well outside The Netherlands as it did in their home country, and Philips dropped them soon afterwards. Their next album, 'Paradise Now', appeared on the Dutch Discofoon label in 1969 and was only marginally less acid-influenced than its predecessor. The band disbanded soon afterwards, but was sporadically active through the 1970's, releasing the odd single, and this post collects all of their non-albums singles and b-sides from that single in 1966 through to their last effort in 1971. While Earth & Fire were a superb Dutch progressive rock band, and Q65 were a great garage/r'n'b outfit, Group 1850 were one of the best 70's acid-rock bands around, and they all deserve a re-assessment of their official output, so do check out their original albums if you can track them down.  



Track listing

01 Misty Night (single 1966)
02 Look Around (b-side of 'Misty Night')
03 Mother No-Head (single 1967)
04 Ever, Ever Green (b-side of 'Mother No-Head')
05 I Know (La Pensee) (b-side of 'I Want More')
06 I Want More (Fingertips) (single 1967)
07 Zero (single 1968)
08 Frozen Mind (b-side of 'Zero')
09 We Love Life (Like We Love You) (single 1968)
10 Don't Let It Be (We Have To Do It Now) (single 1970)
11 Sun Is Coming (So We're Calling You) (b-side of 'Don't Let It Be')
12 Fire (single 1971)
13 Have You Ever Heard (b-side of 'Fire')

Enjoy / Enjoy

Jan & Dean - Carnival Of Sound (1969)

In 1966 Jan and Dean were riding a wave of success (surf joke) with a string of hit singles and albums in the US charts, and being second only in the surf/pop genre to The Beach Boys. Sessions for a new Jan and Dean album began in March 1966, with a few tracks completed before Jan Berry's debilitating car accident the following month. Recording continued sporadically until December 1968 as Berry slowly recovered, and by 1969 the album was deemed complete, but was never released, although collectors have circulated unofficial bootleg versions over the years. If the album had been released in 1969 it could have kick-started a possible psychedelic comeback for the group, but with no new product to keep their name alive their working relationship as a duo soon ended. Although 'Carnival of Sound' is credited as a Jan and Dean record, it is actually more of a Jan Berry solo effort, and consisted mostly of original material, with a few covers of songs by artists such as The Five Satins and The Coasters. However, although Berry wrote and produced most of the material, he only played and sang on a few songs due to complications from his car accident. Dean Torrence, who by that time had become disillusioned with the duo's prospects, only appears on one song, while Glen Campbell made some contributions to the sessions, and singer Tom Bahler performed lead vocals on several songs. The resulting album is particularly notable for having a more psychedelic sound than other Jan and Dean records, and could have been the start in a change of direction for them if it had been released in 1969. Rhino Handmade Records eventually issued the album as a limited-edition mono vinyl record in November 2009, followed by a wider release on compact disc in February 2010, but they both seem to have long gone, and so it's worth posting here as you probably won't be able to hear it anywhere else. 



Track listing

01 Girl, You're Blowing My Mind
02 Mulholland
03 Fan Tan
04 Carnival Of Sound
05 Laurel And Hardy
06 I Know My Mind
07 Love And Hate
08 Tijuana
09 Hawaii
10 Louisiana Man
11 Stay
12 Only A Boy
13 In The Still Of The Night
14 Yakety Yak

Enjoy / Enjoy

Tuesday, 21 May 2019

Traffic - Traffic Update (1971)

Stevie Winwood, Jim Capaldi, Dave Mason, and Chris Wood met when they jammed together at The Elbow Room in Birmingham, and after Winwood left the Spencer Davis Group in April 1967, the quartet formed Traffic, with Capaldi coming up with the name while the four of them were waiting to cross the street in Dorchester. The band signed to Chris Blackwell's Island Records label, and their debut single 'Paper Sun' became a UK hit in mid-1967, and their second single, Mason's psych-pop 'Hole in My Shoe', was an even bigger success. The band's third single, 'Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush', was made for the soundtrack of the 1967 British feature film of the same name, and their debut album 'Mr. Fantasy' was the beginning of an extremely successful, if somewhat troubled, career for the group. There were some initial disagreements, resulting in Mason leaving just after the release of 'Mr Fantasy', but he rejoined in time to contribute to their second eponymous album, before leaving again shortly afterwards. The band toured as a three-piece in 1968, and in their spare time they often played with Jimi Hendrix, with both Winwood and Wood (and an uncredited Mason) all appearing on The Jimi Hendrix Experience's 1968 double album 'Electric Ladyland'. 
They didn't record much music that didn't end up on an album, but there are a few rarities that are worth hearing, and this album attempts to gather them up. It's more for the UK fan, as it includes a few songs which didn't appear on their UK albums, but which did turn up on the US versions. None of the band's first three singles appeared on a UK record, so they are all here, along with a short coda to 'Paper Sun' which closed the US-released 'Heaven Is In Your Mind' album, as well as the b-side to the UK single release of 'Hole In My Shoe'. Alongside those there are a few previously unreleased songs, a BBC session from 1967, and as some of the band's jams with Hendrix have since emerged on bootleg, I've included an extract from one of these, as well as editing a rather rambling 10-minute demo from 1971 into a more concise ballad. The highlight for me is the live version of 'Hole In My Shoe', which was taped in concert in Stockholm in 1967, and includes a lengthy sitar introduction by Dave Mason. It''s not a bad collection, but I think it does emphasize that the band did seem to include most of their best stuff on the records.



Track listing

01 Paper Sun (single 1967)
02 We're A Fade, You Missed This (from the US album 'Heaven Is In Your Mind')
03 Am I What I Was Or Am I What I Am (previously unreleased 1968)
04 Here We Go 'Round The Mulberry Bush (single 1967)
05 I Just Want You To Know (previously unreleased 1970)
06 Smiling Phases (b-side of 'Hole In My Shoe' 1967)
07 Jamming With Jimi (excerpt from 'Jam Thing' with Jimi Hendrix 1968)
08 Hole In My Shoe (live in Stockholm 1967)
09 Sittin' Here Thinkin' Of My Love (previously unreleased 1970)
10 Blindman (BBC session 1967)
11 Hard To Find A Friend (extract from ten minute demo 1971)
12 Withering Tree (b-side of 'You Can All Join In' 1968)

Enjoy / Enjoy

Friday, 17 May 2019

Eric Clapton - Back Yard Blues (1975)

'461 Ocean Boulevard' marked a triumphant return for Eric Clapton, being his first record release after recovering from a three-year addiction to heroin. His manager Robert Stigwood offered every assistance he could, giving Clapton time to write new songs and letting him hire the musicians he wanted for the recording, such as guest vocalist Yvonne Elliman and guitarist George Terry, as well as hiring him a house in Miami to stay in, at 461 Ocean Boulevard. Despite this, the finished album consisted almost entirely of covers, such as his hit rendition of Bob Marley's 'I Shot The Sheriff', with only 'Give Me Strength', 'Let It Grow' and 'Get Ready' (written with Elliman); being original compositions. The sessions yielded many more songs than were needed for the final track listing of the album, and some of these surfaced on the 2004 re-issue of the disc, with others later appearing on the 'Give Me Strength' deluxe edition. The following year Clapton released 'There's One In Every Crowd', which once again had a number of songs held back from the eventual release, and so by taking the best of both sessions we can build a third album that could have slotted easily between those two. The songs are mostly laid-back blues, and I've omitted some of the instrumental jams in favour of actual songs, as they seemed to have more focus. I was going to call the album something along the lines of 'In The Back Yard Of 461 Ocean Boulevard', to tie in with the cover that I'd made using the reverse of the gatefold sleeve of that record, but that was just too unwieldy, so it's become simply 'Back Yard Blues'.



Track listing

01 Ain't That Lovin' You
02 Getting Acquainted (Too Late)
03 Eric After Hours Blues
04 Please Be With Me
05 Lonesome Road Blues (Walkin' Down The Road)
06 Fools Like Me
07 Meet Me (Down At The Bottom)
08 I Found A Love
09 (When Things Go Wrong) It Hurts Me Too

Enjoy / Enjoy

Camel - The Gods Of Light (1976)

Ofir Zwebne of the Skylines Camel Web Page recently posed the question...Would it be possible for Camel to release a compilation album featuring old, rare or 'lost' material, or archived tapes of tasty bits of music from the good ol' years?
Well, let's check what we've got to so far:
A live recording of Peter Bardens' 'Ligging At Louis'' is available on 'A Live Record', and it's a cute piece which reflects the Mirage-era type of Camel's music, but there doesn't seem to be a studio recording available. 'Lord Of Light' surfaced on an official Camel release in 1992, on the 'On the Road 1972' album. Before that, another live rendition was available on the rare 'Greasy Truckers', and Camel did play it during their 1972 gigs along with 'Lady Fantasy' and 'White Rider'. 'Another Night' is an alternative recording of the song which was issued as a 7" single. The recording varies in the mix and some parts are played totally differently. 'Lunar Sea' is a live take which was originally available as the b-side of the 'Another Night' single, and was unavailable anywhere else for quite a while. 'Rainbow's End' is a different version of the track, which appeared on a special 7" promotional release that preceded the 'I Can See...' album. 'Riverman' is a song which is fondly remembered by Susan Hoover. Andy Latimer said in an interview that it was based on Herman Hesse's 'Siddhartha', and that it was an attempt to have a hit single. A extended mix of 'Pressure Points' was pressed up as a 12" single, but doesn't ever seem to have made it past the promo stage. 'In the Arms of Waltzing Frauleins' was a cabaret-like song written by Latimer and Hoover as the opening track of the 'Stationary Traveller' album, but it was rejected by the studio, to be replaced by the instrumental 'Pressure Points'. 
This is all I have gathered so far... And it sums up to more than 45 minutes of interesting material, although not necessarily of the quality that glues an album together...
Are Camel Productions considering such release? Considering - maybe, but it's definitely isn't going to be easy... 
Officially, perhaps, with licencing issues abounding, but relatively easy to actually piece together for a post on the site, so here you go, Ofir, the album that you wanted to hear. 'Ligging At Louis'' was actually recorded for BBC's 'In Concert', and that's the take I've used here, while the version of 'Homage To The Lord Of Light' is an alternate live take which is slightly longer than the 'Greasy Truckers' version, but all the other tracks are as Ofir suggested.



Track listing

01 Homage To The God Of Light
02 Ligging At Louis'
03 Another Light
04 Lunar Sea
05 Rainbow's End
06 Riverman
07 In The Arms Of Waltzing Frauleins
08 Pressure Points

Enjoy / Enjoy

The Verve - One Way To Go (1993)

For a couple of years over 1997 and 1998 The Verve were one of the biggest band on the planet, with singles like 'Bittersweet Symphony' and 'The Drugs Don't Work' propelling them into the mainstream charts, and the 'Urban Hymns' albums becoming an instant indie classic. But it wasn't an overnight success for the band, who'd been slogging around the indie circuit since 1990, releasing singles and EP's to limited underground success, but never managing to break the mainstream. Their 1993 album 'A Storm In Heaven' had a distinctly psychedelic bent, and their live shows were well-received, especially Nick McCabe's  innovative guitar-work and Richard Ashcroft's unpredictable vocals. The band were originally called Verve, but after a legal dispute with the record label of the same named, they rechristened themselves The Verve in 1993, and released a flurry of new music. A few more singles in 1995 helped build their reputation, and two years later they'd hit the big time. This collection charts their slow build-up to mega-stardom, including all their non-album singles and b-sides from 1992 and 1993, as well as a couple of recently discovered out-takes from the 1993 album sessions. Early songs were often lengthy indie/psyche workouts, while later ones embraced the full indie sound, and pointed the way to their later success. Because of the length of some of the songs, this is one of the longest albums I've posted, clocking in at just under an hour and a quarter, but a 73-minute album was not unheard of in the CD age, and I just couldn't bring myself to leave off any of these tracks. 



Track listing

01 All In he Mind (single 1992)
02 One Way To Go (b-side of 'All In The Mind')
03 A Man Called Sun (b-side of 'All In The Mind')
04 She's A Superstar (single 1992)
05 Feel (b-side of 'She's A Superstar')
06 Shoeshine Girl (previously unreleased Sawmills session recording 1993)
07 Gravity Grave (single 1992)
08 Endless Life (b-side of 'Gravity Grave')
09 6 O'Clock (b-side of 'Slide Away' 7" single 1993)
10 South Pacific (previously unreleased Sawmills session recording 1993)
11 Where The Geese Go (b-side of 'Blue' 1993)
12 No Come Down (b-side of 'Blue' 1993)
13 Twilight (b-side of 'Blue' 1993)

Enjoy / Enjoy

The Idle Race - Days Of The Broken Arrows (1970)

The genesis of Idle Race goes back as far as 1959, when core members Dave Pritchard (rhythm guitar) and Roger Spencer (drums), joined forces with vocalist Billy King, bass guitarist Brian Cope, and lead guitarist Al Johnson to play under the name of Billy King And The Nightriders. In 1962, King left the band and was replaced by Mike Sheridan (Michael Tyler), and this change coincided with the band's rise in popularity, culminating in a record deal with EMI in 1964. By this time Cope had been replaced by Greg Masters, and Johnson by lead guitarist and composer Roy Wood, who had his first commercially released composition 'Make Them Understand' on the b-side of a 1965 single by Mike Sherdan's Lot. By December 1965, Wood had joined forces with other musicians to form The Move, and so had to leave The Nightriders in January 1966 when The Move started touring. Wood's place in the Nightriders was filled by Johnny Mann, a band-mate of Carl Wayne in The Vikings, with Wayne now joining Wood in The Move. Sheridan felt that the band had come full circle and also decided to leave, leading the remaining members of the band to consider a change in direction, starting with a shortening of their name to 'The Nightriders', and then signing a new recording contract with Polydor Records. Mann departed shortly thereafter, and was replaced by Jeff Lynne, who was at the time an unknown guitar prodigy from Birmingham, and the classic Idle Race line-up was complete. 
They were still called The Nightriders when they released their sole Polydor single  'It's Only The Dog'/'Your Friend', in 1966, but with Lynne starting to provide a string of catchy Bealtesque songs, they changed their name again, firstly to The Idyll Race, and then The Idle Race. Wood, now a major star in the Move, helped arrange a record deal with the new British arm of Liberty Records, and BBC disc jockeys such as John Peel and Kenny Everett were big supporters of the group. Their debut single on Liberty was to be a cover of Wood's 'Here We Go 'Round the Lemon Tree', but the Move's own version, which was on the b-side of their 'Flowers In The Rain' single, began getting national airplay on British radio, and so Liberty abruptly pulled the single in the UK (although it was still released by Liberty in the US). Subsequent singles also had little success, but despite this the band released their debut album 'The Birthday Party' in 1968, which has since gone on to be considered a classic record of the psychedelic era. In February 1969 Lynne received an offer to replace Trevor Burton in the Move, but he declined as he hoped to steer The Idle Race to commercial success with their second, eponymous album for Liberty. Two singles were released to promote the record, but they also failed to chart, and the album itself was not well-received. In January 1970, Lynne accepted a second offer by Wood to join The Move, on condition that they would eventually retire that band and concentrate on a new venture, Electric Light Orchestra, and so the classic line-up of The Idle Race was no more. 
Mike Hopkins (guitar) and Dave Walker (vocals) were hired to replace Lynne, and a cover of Mungo Jerry's 'In the Summertime' finally got them into the top 10 in Argentina, followed by another cover, although this time their version of Hotlegs' 'Neanderthal Man' did not fare so well. In 1971 the band produced their final album 'Time Is' for Regal Zonophone, and they limped on for another year before finally disbanding in 1972, with some of the members going on to form The Steve Gibbons Band. Strangely enough, in the year before Lynne left, the band did record almost enough material to issue another Lynne-fronted album in 1970, although to make the running time up to a reasonable length we would have to include the two post-Lynne covers and a couple of early non-album singles to flesh it out. There'a also a BBC session version of Moby Grape's 'Hey Grandma' included, as they used to play this in concert, so they could well have considered recording a version of it for an album, and the otherwise unreleased 'Frantic Desolation' could have made it as well, although unfortunately the only available take of this song is taped from a radio broadcast, and so is not the best quality. Although the timespan of the music is perhaps a bit too wide to produce a coherent album, we do end up with an interesting collection of singles, b-sides, radio sessions and alternate takes that you won't hear on any of the band's studio records. 



Track listing

01 Imposters Of Life's Magazine (single 1967)
02 My Father's Son (b-side of '(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree')
03 Knocking Nails Into My House (b-side of 'The Skeleton And The Roundabout' 1968)
04 (Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree (single 1967)
05 Follow Me Follow (alternate version)
06 Days Of The Broken Arrows (single 1969)
07 Hey Grandma (BBC session 1967)
08 Lucky Man (alternate version)
09 Neanderthal Man (single 1970)
10 Worn Red Carpet (b-side of 'Days Of The Broken Arrows')
11 Victim Of Circumstance (b-side of 'Neanderthal Man')
12 In The Summertime (single 1970)
13 Frantic Desolation (BBC Session 1969)
14 Told You Twice (b-side of 'In The Summertime')

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For fans of Genesis and Yes

 As a special treat before I start tonight's posting, here are a couple of videos that I stumbled on last night. The Genesis one is a 1973 concert that been around for a while, but the Genesis Museum have taken the original tapes and run them through some sophisticated equipment to significantly enhance the picture quality. In order for the sound to match the new video they've sourced audio from various bootleg recordings and expertly synched it to the pictures. I've studied 'Watcher Of The Skies' and can honestly say that I can't see the joins.
The Yes video is a number of their 1969 performances on the German Beat Club TV show, and these have also been remastered and cleaned up, and put together into one video.
If you are even the mildest fan of progressive rock or of these two bands in particular then you simply must see these two videos. 





Tuesday, 14 May 2019

The Artwoods - In The Deep End (1967)

Art Wood had been a vocalist with Alexis Korner's Blues Incorporated for a short period during 1962, while simultaneously fronting his own group, the Art Wood Combo. When keyboardist Jon Lord and guitarist Derek Griffiths joined the Art Wood Combo, the Artwoods were formed, and recruited Keef Hartley on drums and Malcolm Pool as bassist to complete the line-up. In 1964 the band turned professional, and were soon signed by Decca Records, where their debut single was going to be a cover of Muddy Waters' 'Hoochie Coochie Man', before that was shelved in favour of a rendition of an old Lead Belly song, 'Sweet Mary'. Although that didn't chart, it got sufficient airplay to bring the band a lot of live work, including an appearance on the first live edition of 'Ready Steady Go!'. Their next couple of singles were also blues covers, and they finally cracked the charts with their cover of 'I Take What I Want', reaching number 28 on 8 May 1966. Buoyed by this success the band released their only album 'Art Gallery' in 1966, but it sold few copies and so they were dropped by Decca at the end the year. The band signed a one-record deal with Parlophone, but the release of 'What Shall I Do' also had no success, and their last chart attempt was engineered by their manager, who thought it would be a good idea to dress them in gangster gear and change their name to St. Valentine's Day Massacre, in the hope of piggy-backing some publicity from the release of the 'Bonnie And Clyde' film. Their only single under this guise fared no better then the others, and the band finally called it a day in 1967. In 1975 Art's younger brother Ronnie Wood joined the Rolling Stones to replace Mick Taylor, and when word got around that he was Art's brother, the Artwoods records became sought-after items almost over-night, increasing rapidly in value due to the small numbers that they sold at the time of their release. It's a shame that they didn't have more success in their prime, as they were a hard-working band who were just unlucky that their singles didn't seem to appeal to the record-buying public. Although they only released the one album in their lifetime, there was enough music recorded for singles and b-sides over the following year, plus a couple of BBC sessions and the St. Valentine's Day Massacre single (where they were in fact The Artwoods in all but name), to put together a possible follow-up to 'Art Gallery', which could have come out in 1967. 



Track listing

01 I Feel Good (single 1966)
02 Molly Anderson's Cookery Book (b-side of 'I Feel Good')
03 In The Deep End (b-side of 'What Shall I Do?')
04 What Shall I Do? (single 1967)
05 I Take What I Want (single 1966)
06 She Knows What To Do (b-side of 'Goodbye Sisters')
07 Routine (from the 'Jazz In Jeans' EP 1966)
08 Steady Gettin' It (BBC session 1967)
09 Goodbye Sisters (single 1965)
10 I'm Looking For A Saxophone Player Doubling French Horn Wearing Size 37 Boots 
                                                                                             (b-side of 'I Take What I Want')
11 Brother Can You Spare A Dime? (from the single as St Valentines's Day Massacre 1967)
12 Our Man Flint (from the 'Jazz In Jeans' EP 1966)
13 Day Tripper (BBC session 1967)
14 Al's Party (b-side of 'Brother Can You Spare A Dime?')

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Friday, 10 May 2019

Scott Walker - Sings Songs From The Movies (1972)

Scott Walker was the master of the majestic ballad...and where better to find these songs than at the movies. It was such an obvious place to source the sort of songs that he loved that he released an album very much along these lines in 1972, with his 'The Moviegoer' record, collecting a dozen songs from movies old and new, and giving them the distinctive Walker treatment. This album is a sort of follow-up to that one, as although it does include a few songs from 'The Moviegoer', it also has themes from other films which never made it to that release. People might have forgotten that songs like 'The Look Of Love' actually featured in 1967's 'Casino Royale', or that 'I Will Wait For You' came from 1964's 'The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg', as they have since become classic songs in their own right. I didn't even realise that the theme from 'The Godfather' had lyrics until I heard this version, as I'd only ever heard instrumental takes before. I would have loved to include 'The Impossible Dream' from 1972's 'The Man Of La Mancha', but it just didn't seem to fit with the general vibe of the album, which is also why songs like 'Joe Hill' and 'All His Children' had to go. We are therefore left with a beautiful collection of ballads which can only go some way to consolidating the 'godlike genius' epithet which was bestowed upon him before his sad death a few weeks ago at the age of 76.  



Track listing

01 I Will Wait For You (from 'The Umbrellas Of Cherbourg')
02 I Have Dreamed (from 'The King And I')
03 Come Saturday Morning (theme from 'Pookie')
04 The Look Of Love (from 'Casino Royale')
05 The Gentle Rain (theme from 'The Gentle Rain')
06 That Night (theme from 'The Fox')
07 I Still See You (love theme from 'The Go-Between')
08 The Summer Knows (theme from 'Summer of '42')
09 If She Walked Into My Life (from 'Mame')
10 Loss Of Love (theme from 'Sunflower')
11 Glory Road (theme from 'W.U.S.A.')
12 Easy Come, Easy Go (theme from 'They Shoot Horses, Don't They?')
13 Speak Softly Love (theme from 'The Godfather')
14 The Ballad Of Sacco And Vanzetti (theme from 'Sacco And Vanzetti')

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Deep Purple - Coronarias Redig (1974)

In May 1968 Deep Purple recorded their debut album 'Shades Of Deep Purple' at Pye Studios in London's Marble Arch, and once that was released in September of that year they quickly recorded their second 'The Book of Taliesyn', which was issued a few months later. The sessions from both of these have yielded a few out-takes, and the band were also regular guests on BBC radio shows, and so we have a number of unheard songs featuring singer Rod Evans. Early in 1969 the band released the one-off single 'Emmaretta', named after Emmaretta Marks, a cast member of the musical 'Hair' whom Evans was trying to seduce. Later that year the band had their first major upheaval, with Nick Simper and Rod Evans being fired, and replacements Roger Glover and Ian Gillan being brought in to make up the classic Mark II version of the band. The very first thing they recorded was the non-album single 'Hallelujah', before they got stuck into recording the classic 'In Rock' album, from which we have a couple of choice out-takes. The 'Fireball' sessions in 1971 also provide a further brace of leftovers, and the final out-take is from the 'Machine Head' sessions in 1972. We close with a 1974 b-side, which was originally intended to be a song with lyrics, expounding Ian Paice's suggestion of 'the return of the coronet', but on the day of recording Coverdale had vocal issues and so it was recorded as an instrumental and stuck of the b-side of 'Might Just Take Your Life'. All in all this is a nice overview of the Mark I, Mark II, and Mark III versions of the band, showing their progression from promising newcomers to all-encompassing global superstars. 



Track listing

01 Shadows (out-take 1968)
02 Oh No No No (out-take 1968)
03 Emmaretta (single 1969)
04 It's All Over (BBC session 1968)
05 Hey Bop A Re Bop (BBC session 1968)
06 Playground (out-take 1968)
07 Hallelujah (single 1969)
08 Cry Free (out-take 1970)
09 Jam Stew (out-take 1970)
10 Slow Train (out-take 1971)
11 Freedom (out-take 1971)
12 Painted Horse (out-take 1972)
13 Coronarias Redig (b-side of 'Might Just Take Your Life' 1974)   


Stray - Encore (1976)

Stray were formed in 1966 by vocalist Steve Gadd, guitarist Del Bromham, bass player Gary Giles, and drummer Steve Crutchley while they were all still at school. Ritchie Cole replaced Crutchley in 1968, and two years later they signed to Transatlantic Records, then mostly known for being a folk label. The group's brand of melodic, hook-laden hard rock proved to be a popular draw on the local club scene during the early 1970's, and they had a loyal following who bought their albums and treated them as their own well-kept secret. They released a few singles during their career, but none of them were hits, and I doubt that the band expected them to be as they weren't really chart material, but a couple of them did have exclusive b-sides as a treat for the fans. In 1975 their label issued the 'Tracks' compilation, which gathered together some of these songs, alongside a couple of rare out-takes, and so this post not only includes those b-sides and a few later-period out-takes, but also four demos that the band recorded for Pye Records in 1969, which show a more down-to-earth hard rock style, with just a hint of psyche on their cover of Fever Tree's 'The Man Who Paints The Pictures'. 



Track listing

01 Change Your Mind (Pye Demo 1969)
02 The Man Who Paints The Pictures (Pye Demo 1969)
03 In The Night (Pye Demo 1969)
04 Outcast (Pye Demo 1969)
05 Mama's Coming Home (b-side of 'Our Song' 1971)
06 Georgia (from the 'Tracks' compilation 1975)
07 Get Out Right Away (from the 'Tracks' compilation 1975)
08 Take A Life (b-side of 'You Went Away' 1976)
09 Brand New Day (b-side of 'Hallelujah' 1973)
10 Recover (b-side of 'Precious Love' 1975)
11 Paramout (out-take from 'Stand Up And Be Counted' 1975)
12 Johnny (out-take from 'Hearts Of Fire' 1976)
13 Encore (out-take from 'Suicide' 1971)

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The Graham Bond Organization - Strut Around (1966)

The Graham Bond Organization were one of the first ever jazz-rock bands, and a training ground for musicians who would later go on to achieve huge success with other groups. The original line-up included Ginger Baker on drums, John McLaughlin on guitar (later replaced by Dick Heckstall-Smith on tenor and soprano sax), and Jack Bruce on bass, as well as Bond himself on organ, alto sax and vocals. Their energetic live sets of raucous r'n'b mixed with jazz earned the band a reputation of being one of the best bands of the early 60's, and in 1965 they released the ground-breaking album 'The Sound Of '65', which included their hit version of the classic 'Wade In The Water'. Never a band to play by the rules, they played themselves in the movie 'Gonks Go Beat' in 1965, playing two of their numbers in the film, and their 'Lease On Love' single from the same year featured one of the first uses of a Mellotron on disc. The band was always a volatile working environment, with widespread drug abuse, and an ongoing feud between Bruce and Baker, which eventually resulted in both of them leaving and reconciling long enough to form Cream with Eric Clapton! Bond and Heckstall-Smith reformed the group as a trio with John Hiseman on drums, but it was never the same, and internal problems and the ever-present drug issues caused the band to disintegrate in 1967. Bond carried on making music for the next few years, but seemed to be increasingly obsessed with Black Magic, and his mental health was the subject of some speculation, particularly after his death in 1974, when he fell in front of a train at London's Finsbury Park tube station. Let's remember him and the band at their peak with this collection of rare tracks from 1964 to 1966.



Track listing

01 Long Tall Shorty (b-side of 'Long Legged Baby')
02 Little Girl (from the 'Rhythm & Blues' Decca compilation 1964)
03 Hoochie Coochie Man (from the 'Rhythm & Blues' Decca compilation 1964)
04 Harmonica (from the 'Gonks Go Beat' soundtrack 1965)
05 Love Come Shining Through (b-side of 'Tell Me (I'm Gonna Love Again)')
06 Wade In The Water (from the 'Gonks Go Beat' soundtrack 1965)
07 High Heel Sneakers (from the 'Rhythm & Blues' Decca compilation 1964)
08 Strut Around (from the 'Rhythm & Blues' Decca compilation 1964)
09 My Heart's In Little Pieces (b-side of 'Lease On Love')
10 Long Legged Baby (single 1964)
11 Tell Me (I'm Gonna Love Again) (single 1965)
12 Soul Tango (b-side of 'St. James Infirmary')
13 Lease On Love (single 1965)
14 St. James Infirmary (single 1966)

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